Munich School of Ancient Philosophy
print


Breadcrumb Navigation


Content

Current Seminars

      *for more information about individual courses, see the online course catalog*

Winter Semester 2019-20 (14 Oct. 2019 - 8 Feb. 2020)

Oberseminar - Research Seminar on Empedocles (Adamson, Primavesi)
Tu. 12:00 - 14:00 c.t. Musaph Seminar Room (Leopoldstr. 11b, Room 433)
This semester the research seminar on ancient Greek philosophy will look at the fragments of the Presocratic philosopher Empedocles. Participants will take it in turn to present selections from the fragments, in each case discussing the context in which these fragments are transmitted, which will mean looking at the way Aristotle and later ancient thinkers reacted to and understood Empedocles.

Doktorandenkolloquium (Adamson)
Th. 14:00 - 16:00 c.t. Musaph Seminar Room (Leopoldstr. 11b, Room 433)
Vorstellung und Diskussion von Projekten der Teilnehmer. Die Diskussionen erfolgen sowohl in deutscher als auch in englischer Sprache.
Presentation and discussion of the participants' current projects. The discussions will be held either in German or in English.

Advanced Seminar -  Plato on Action (Odzuck)
Mo. 16:00 -18:00 c.t. Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 (E) - E 210
Although none of his dialogues has human action as its main topic, Plato on many occasions discusses questions and problems that today belong to the Philosophy of Action. In this seminar, we will follow Plato's interest in these questions by carefully reading and discussing selected passages of his work, as well as recent literature on these texts. The seminar will be guided by the following questions: Why is Plato interested in the discussion of action? What are actions at all? What is their ontological status? How can actions be distinguished from each other? What is the appropriate explanation of an action? What are the different factors responsible for the occurrence of actions? Do we also act when we do nothing at all? What is the relationship between actions and achieving a good life? In this seminar, we will see that Plato in his work (contrary to what many scholars seem to think) does not only discuss fundamental questions and problems of the Philosophy of Action but also develops a set of powerful instruments for analyzing and explaining human action. The texts will be made available in the seminar. The participants are expected to carefully prepare the passages of the text to be read and to be willing to participate. In addition, three text summaries are to be prepared. Knowledge of Greek is an advantage, but not a prerequisite.

Advanced Seminar - Ancient Views on Dialectic (Hauer)
Wed. 16:00 - 18:00 c.t. Geschw.-Scholl-Pl- 1 (D) - D Z005
In this seminar, we will examine different views on dialectic from Plato to the Neoplatonists. The conception of dialectic as question-and-answer argumentation can be found in Plato, Aristotle and several Stoics. However, the account of its specific techniques and its status differ among these thinkers. While Plato’s works include the account of dialectic as a science and as being linked to the knowledge of the Good, Aristotle conceives of it primarily as a kind of syllogism and thus links it to a specific part of logic. Aristotle acknowledges that certain aspects of dialectic may serve as instruments of philosophy and Peripatetics develop the idea of logic as an instrument of philosophy. Although the Stoics also conceive of dialectic as a part of logic and thus maintain the connection between dialectic and logic, they claim that logic is a part, and not an instrument, of philosophy. These three views were the most prominent ones for later philosophers and formed the background against which they discussed dialectic. While Alcinous appears to syncretize them, Alexander of Aphrodisias and Plotinus clearly distinguish between the three views. In order to return to Plato’s understanding of dialectic, Plotinus distinguishes dialectic from logic. Later Neoplatonists, such as Syrianus, follow Plotinus in doing so.

Advanced Seminar - Al-Razi, Doubts about Galen (Adamson, Hansberger)
Tu. 10:00 -12:00 c.t. Musaph Seminar Room (Leopoldstr. 11b, 4. Room 433)
In this seminar we will read selections from Doubts About Galen (Shukuk ‘ala Jalinus), on the basis of a recently appeared edition by Pauline Koetschet. This work may at first seem to be a critique of Galen’s medical theories by his fellow doctor, Abu Bakr al-Razi (d.925 CE), it is in fact full of philosophical material on topics ranging from the eternity of the world to epistemology, from the nature of vision to atomism. In our seminar we will read selections of the more philosophically intriguing material; participants will take it in turns to read the Arabic and translate into English, so competence in these languages is a prerequisite for participation.

Advanced Seminar - Generation, Alteration and Mixture in Aristotle and Beyond (Anagnostopoulos and Castelli)
Tu. 16:00 - 18:00 Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 (D) - D Z005
It is hard to exaggerate the importance of the distinction between generation (the coming to be of a new substance) and alteration (mere qualitative change) in Aristotle. On the one hand, he claims that his materialist predecessors could not, unlike him, do justice to this distinction, while on the other, it is a fraught question how his general model of change can be applied to the case of substantial coming-to-be (generation) without threatening the very status of his prized substances. The physical phenomenon of mixture or blending of material constituents has drawn the attention of philosophers from Aristotle down to the present. At least prima facie it seems to make incompatible demands: on the one hand, none of the ingredients of a mixture should continue to exist, since all parts of a genuine mixture are alike; on the other hand, the ingredients of a mixture should not simply be destroyed if mixing is to be distinct from generation and corruption. Mixture seems to occupy a middle ground between generation and alteration. In this course, we will begin by exploring these topics in Aristotle's De Generatione et Corruptione, situating them within a broader framework of Aristotle's hylomorphism and theory of the elements, and against the background of his predecessors. In the second part of the course we will move on to consider the later ancient and contemporary reception of, and reaction to, Aristotle's account of mixture (for example: Alexander's critical exposition of the rival Stoic theory of mixture and Richard Sharvy's more recent topological account of mixture).

Advanced Seminar - Pleton, On the Difference Between Plato and Aristotle (Adamson)
Th. 10:00 - 12:00 c.t. Musaph Seminar Room (Leopoldstr. 11b, Room 433)
In this seminar we will read a notorious work by the most notorious thinker of the Byzantine philosophical tradition, George Gemithos, also known as Plethon. Often thought to have diverged from Christian belief in order to embrace Neoplatonic paganism, Plethon also caused outrage (and provoked a refutation from his contemporary Scholarios) by attacking the great Aristotle and accusing him of unjustified and disloyal departure from the teachings of his own master, Plato. Topics highlighted in the work include the question of whether God is a creator of the world, as Plato believed, or simply an intellective mover, as Aristotle taught, and whether Aristotle was right to reject Plato’s theory of Forms. The work is important not only for an understanding of Neoplatonism and its reception in late Byzantium but also as a forerunner of developments of the Italian Renaissance, notably the similar dispute between Plethon’s student Bessarion and a critic of Plato, George Trapezuntius. We will read the work in English translation but with reference to the Greek text, so facility in both languages is recommended for participants.

Advanced Seminar - Aristotle on the Virtues (Brüllmann)
Wed. 12:00 - 14:00 c.t. Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 (A) - A 020
The topic of our class is a centrepiece, not only of Aristotle's ethical theory but also of ancient ethics and - due to the revived interest in the virtues - of ethical debates more generally. Our aim is to read and discuss passages from Aristotle's Nicomachean (and to some extent, Eudemian) Ethics as well as secondary literature. Against a common trend in the reception of Aristotle's theory of the virtues, our focus will not be on the notorious 'doctrine of the mean' but rather on Aristotle's treatment of the individual virtues and on the relationship between the virtues of character and phronesis, as discussed in Book VI.

Winter Semester 2018-19 (15 Oct. 2018 - 9 Feb. 2019)

Oberseminar - Research Seminar on Aristotle's Categories (Rapp, Primavesi)
Tu. 12:00 - 14:00 c.t. Musaph Seminar Room (Leopoldstr. 11b, Room 433)
In this semester we will read and discuss Aristotle's treatise, the Categories. Knowledge of English and Ancient Greek is required.

Tutorium to the Oberseminar- Reading Aristotle in Greek: The Categories. (Primavesi)
Tu. 14:00 - 16:00 c.t. Musaph Seminar Room (Leopoldstr. 11b, Room 433)
In this course we will carefully read through Aristotle's Categories in Greek, with special attention to the philosophical use of the language as well as to text-critical issues. The course is meant to complement the Ancient Philosophy Research Seminar, taking place Tuesdays at 12. The course will be conducted in English and those in attendance should have basic knowledge of Ancient Greek. Participants will be asked to prepare the text to be discussed each week in advance. Please contact Dr. Christina Prapa (prapa@lmu.de) in order to obtain the Greek text we will be using before instruction starts.

Doktorandenkolloquium (Rapp)
Tu. 18:00 - 20:00 c.t. Musaph Seminar Room (Leopoldstr. 11b, Room 433)
Vorstellung und Diskussion von Projekten der Teilnehmer. Die Diskussionen erfolgen sowohl in deutscher als auch in englischer Sprache.
Presentation and discussion of the participants' current projects. The discussions will be held either in German or in English.

Oberseminar - Ancient Theories of Argumentation (Rapp)
Tu. 16:00 - 18:00 Musaph Seminar Room (Leopoldstr. 11b, Room 433)
The seminar is dedicated to selected aspects of ancient theories of argumentation. Participants with an interest in ancient dialectic, logic, rhetoric and argumentation theory will have the opportunity to present their own ideas and projects. Among the topics discussed will be: Plato's dialectical method, dialectic argumentation in Aristotle, Aristotle's theory of the enthymeme, sign arguments in Aristotle and in Stoic logic, the role of topoi in ancient argumentation theory, Cicero's topics, etc.

Advanced Seminar with Tutorium - Atomism (Anagnostopoulos, Hauer)
Wed. 12:00 - 14:00 c.t. Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 - A U121, and 14:00 - 16:00 Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 C07
Atomism posits indivisible entities that make up the world, and seeks to explain all phenomena, ultimately, on the basis of the properties and behavior of atoms. Despite the seeming simplicity of this approach, the ancient atomists were credited with a certain degree of sophistication in accounting for a variety of phenomena in the natural world, but they also developed some of the most interesting approaches to questions that might seem to be beyond the reach of a strictly materialistic approach, such as moral responsibility. In this course, held in English, we will focus on understanding and evaluating ancient atomistic theories and their ancient reception, through close reading of the ancient texts (in English translation) and contemporary secondary literature. Ancient thinkers we will discuss include Leucippus, Democritus, Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, and Lucretius. In addition to the seminar, there is an "Übung", in which we will discuss the material at greater depth, or possibly, read texts in the original language, depending on the interests of the students. In the latter case, the Übung will be strictly optional.

Fortgeschrittenenseminar und Essaykurs - Lust und Leid in der antiken Philosophie (Platon, Aristoteles, Epikur) (Brüllmann)
Fr. 10:00 - 12:00 c.t. Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 - M 201
Die Phänomene Lust und Schmerz bzw. Freude und Leid spielen in der antiken Ethik und Moralpsychologie eine zentrale Rolle. Das Verhältnis antiker Philosophen zu diesen Phänomenen ist allerdings oft ambivalent. Auf der einen Seite scheint niemand zu bestreiten, dass Lust und Schmerz (a) starke motivationale Faktoren darstellen (wir tun viele Dinge, weil wir Lust erstreben und Schmerz vermeiden wollen) und dass sie (b) positiv bzw. negativ besetzt sind (Freude zu empfinden ist offensichtlich etwas Gutes, Leid zu empfinden etwas Schlechtes). Eine angemessene Philosophie der menschlichen Angelegenheiten muss diese Aspekte berücksichtigen. Auf der anderen Seite würden die meisten antiken Philosophen vor einer konsequent hedonistischen Position zurückschrecken und darauf hinweisen, dass (a) Lust und Schmerz uns oft dazu bringen, das Falsche zu tun (z.B. wegzulaufen, wo wir standhalten sollten) und es (b) andere Güter gibt (wie etwa die Tugend), die einen deutlich höheren Wert haben als Freude und Leid. Antike Debatten um Lust und Leid nehmen daher oft die Form einer Kritik des Hedonismus an.
In unserem Seminar werden wir zunächst anhand ausgewählter Texte die Positionen von Platon (Gorgias, Philebos) und Aristoteles (Nikomachische Ethik) betrachten. Dabei wollen wir nicht nur nachvollziehen, wie sie die Rolle von Lust und Schmerz begreifen, sondern auch, von welcher Konzeption dieser Phänomene sie ausgehen. Danach werden wir uns der Auffassung Epikurs zuwenden und versuchen, die wohl wichtigste (aber oft missverstandene) Version des antiken Hedonismus zu verstehen.

Fortgeschrittenenseminar - Avicennas Seelenlehre (Hansberger)
Wed. 16:00 - 18:00 c.t. Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 - M 201
Depending on the preferences of the group the Seminar will be conducted in English or German.
Kommentar
Avicennas Seelenlehre ist ein wichtiger und einflussreicher Teil seiner Philosophie. Aufbauend auf der Aristotelischen Psychologie geht es dabei um die Seele als dasjenige, was sämtliche Lebensfunktionen eines lebendigen Wesens bestimmt -- von Ernährung und Wachstum über die Wahrnehmung bis hin zu den höchsten geistigen Tätigkeiten der Vernunft. Anhand des Kapitels zur Seelenlehre aus Avicennas "Buch der Rettung" (Kitab al-Najat) sowie Auszügen aus anderen Texten, vornehmlich aus dem "Buch der Heilung" (Kitab al-Šifaʾ), werden wir Avicennas komplexes und detailliertes System der Seelenvermögen erarbeiten und einige für ihn zentrale Themen genauer beleuchten. Neben dem berühmten Gedankenexperiment des "fliegenden Menschen", mit dem Avicenna die Unabhängigkeit der Seele bzw. des Selbst vom Körper veranschaulichen will, gehören dazu u.a. die Frage, wie unsere sinnlichen Wahrnehmungen zur Grundlage von rein intellektiver, vom Materiellen per se unabhängiger Erkenntnis werden kann; welche kognitiven Fähigkeiten Tiere besitzen; wie Prophetie möglich ist; und welches Schicksal die menschliche Seele nach dem Tod erwartet.

Advanced Seminar - The Ethics of Abu Bakr al-Razi (Hansberger)
Tu. 10:00 - 12:00 c.t. Amalienstr. 17 - A 107
The physician and philosopher Abu Bakr al-Razi (d. 925) is famous first and foremost for his medical writings; but over the last decades, the philosophical work of this highly original thinker has come to be more and more appreciated. In this term's reading class, we will focus on al-Razi's ethics, reading the brief treatise Kitab al-Sira al-falsafiyya ("The Philosophical Life") as well as excerpts from Kitab al-Ṭibb al-ruḥani ("The Spiritual Medicine"). In "The Spiritual Medicine", conceived of as a companion work to his medical work al-Kitab al-Manṣuri, al-Razi sets out to develop a spiritual "regimen" which will free the soul from ist ailments, i.e. vices and passions, and lead to the achievement of a virtuous (i.e. healthy) character. In Kitab al-Sira al-falsafiyya, the author defends himself against the accusation of not having lived up to his Socratic ideal of a philosophical life. Arguing against strict asceticism, al-Razi instead proposes a life of moderation that strives to avoid causing pain to any living being - including animals. As we will read the texts in the original Arabic, knowledge of classical Arabic is required for participation in the class.

Vorlesung - Moralpsychologie, Antike und Heute (Rapp)
Mo. 14:00 - 16:00 c.t. Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 - M 018
Moralpsychologie untersucht die psychologischen Voraussetzungen der Ethik. Sie stellt heute eine der am schnellsten wachsenden Teile der praktischen Philosophie dar und profitiert von der Zusammenarbeit mit der Psychologie. Gleichzeitig gründet sich die Moralpsychologie auf wichtige Voraussetzungen aus der antiken Philosophie. Daher behandelt die Vorlesung alle Grundfragen der Moralpsychologie immer zugleich mit einem Blick auf die antike und auf die gegenwärtige Diskussion. Folgende Themen werden eine zentrale Rolle spielen:
- Motive und Präferenzen: rational und nicht-rational
- Entscheidungen
- Willensschwäche (akrasia)
- Will-Power
- Moralische Emotionen
- Charakterzüge
- Tugendhafte Charakterzüge
- Moralische Entwicklung
- Egoismus und Altruismus

 

Previous Semesters

Summer Semester 2018

Musaph Research Oberseminar (Adamson, Lattmann, Rapp)
Current research projects in ancient philosophy.
Tu. 12-14 c.t. Leopoldstr. 11b, 4. Stock, Raum 433

Doktorandenkolloquium (Rapp)
Tu. 18-20 c.t. Leopoldstr. 11b, 4. Stock, Raum 433

Hauptseminar - Aristoteles' Topik (Rapp, Castelli)
Aristoteles' Topik entfaltet eine Methode für die dialektische Unterredung. Unter 'Dialektik' versteht Aristoteles ein Verfahren, durch das Thesen jeglichen Inhalts überprüft werden können. Im dialektischen Streitgespräch findet diese Überprüfung mit verteilten Rollen statt: die fragende Person hat die Aufgabe, eine These anzugreifen und zu widerlegen, die antwortende Person hat die Aufgabe, die entsprechende These zu verteidigen. Gelingt es dem Angreifer, den Verteidiger zu widersprüchlichen Aussagen zu verleiten, gilt die These als widerlegt. Wichtigstes Instrument für dieses Verfahren ist eine Liste sogenannter 'Topoi' - d.h. Argumentationsanleitungen und -schemata, mit denen der Angreifer die vorgegebene These auf Widerlegungsquellen hin analysieren kann. Das dialektische Verfahren, sagt Aristoteles, dient einerseits der Einübung der philosophischen Diskussionsweise, andererseits ist es aber auch von Bedeutung, wenn es darum geht, philosophisch-wissenschaftliche Prinzipien aufzufinden. Die Auseinandersetzung mit der Dialektik nimmt in der Forschung immer größeren Raum ein. Die Dialektik ist wichtig, um Aristoteles' eigenes philosophisches Vorgehen zu verstehen. Andererseits liefert die Dialektik auch wichtige Inspirationen für die moderne Logik und Argumentationstheorie.
Di. 16:00 bis 18:00 c.t.  MusaPh (Leopoldstr. 11b, 4. Stock, Raum 433)

Advanced Seminar und Tutorium - Form and Matter, Actuality and Potentiality: Aristotle's Hylomorphism. (Anagnostopoulos, Pfeiffer)
Aristotle believes that ordinary material objects, and especially living organisms, like plants and animals, are substances. However, he also believes that these substances are hylomorphic composites, that is, composites of form and matter. Unlike the materialists, who claim that such ordinary objects are most fundamentally the matter they are made of, and that the lowest level constituents of the physical world (be they atoms or stuffs) are the only genuine substances, Aristotle suggests that what material substances fundamentally are is their form. At the same time, he distances his view from the Platonic conception of forms as separately existing universals. Aristotle arrives at this new conception of material substances through a complex and often roundabout discussion which engages with his predecessors' views. Moreover, Aristotle faces a significant challenge that he himself seems to be the first to fully develop: if material substances are composites of form and matter, how can they be genuine unities, rather than accidental compounds? Aristotle's response to this challenge crucially invokes the distinction between potentiality and actuality. In this course we will focus primarily on the so-called "middle books" of the Metaphysics, books VII-IX, but we will also look at excerpts from other works. Each week, we will also read and discuss recent secondary literature. Participants should have some familiarity either with Aristotle or with contemporary metaphysics. Knowledge of ancient Greek is not required, though it is always useful. Readings will be in English, though contributions and term papers in German are welcome. This course has an Übung in which the issues raised will be discussed in greater depth; participants should attend both parts of the course.
Mo. 10:00 - 12:00 c.t. Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 (E) - E 210 and Th. 10:00 - 12:00 c.t. Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 (E) - E 212

Advanced Seminar - The Ancient Reception of Plato’s Timaeus (Adamson)
Though it is not necessary the most popular of Plato’s dialogues today, no Platonic text was more influential in later antiquity and the medieval period than his Timaeus. In this work the title character sets out an account of the fashioning of the cosmos by a divine craftsman or “demiurge,” with details given about the nature of the elements, the sensory properties of bodies, and human nature. Thus ancients saw the Timaeus as the key Platonic text for natural philosophy, a kind of pendant (or rival) to Aristotle’s Physics, and also as a source for his theology. In this seminar we will read selections from a range of ancient authors who engaged directly with the Timaeus, beginning with so-called “Middle” Platonists (Alcinous and Plutarch) before moving on to the Neoplatonists Plotinus, Syrianus, and Proclus. All texts will be made available in both English and ancient Greek.
Mo. 12:00 -14:00 c.t.  MusaPh (Leopoldstr. 11b, 4. Stock, Raum 433)

Spezialvorlesung - Aristoteles' Biologie (Rapp)
Gut ein Viertel des Aristotelischen Gesamtwerks ist Fragen der Biologie und Zoologie gewidmet. Aristoteles ist der erste, der Gemeinsamkeiten und Unterschiede verschiedener biologischer Spezies systematisch erforscht und auf der Grundlage dieser Forschung eine Systematik der verschiedenen Gattungen und Arten (Taxonomie) entwirft. Grundlage der bei Aristoteles neu entstehenden Disziplin der Biologie ist eine erstaunlich umfangreiche und differenzierte Materialsammlung (vorgelegt in der Schrift Historia Animalium), die biologische Phänomene – z.T. auf Tiersektionen beruhend – auflistet. Besondere Beachtung erfahren die morphologischen und funktionalen Gemeinsamkeiten und Unterschiede hinsichtlich der Organe, Extremitäten und Anatomie im Allgemeinen (De Partibus Animalium), Fragen der Zeugung, Fortpflanzung, Embryologie, Schwangerschaft, Geburt und Vererbung (De Generatione Animalium) sowie die Fort- und Selbstbewegung von Lebewesen (De Incessu Animalium, De Motu Animalium). Aristoteles‘ Naturforschung ist zugleich aufs Engste mit seiner Philosophie verknüpft – u.a. mit seiner wissenschaftlichen Methodologie (Analytica Posteriora), seiner Lehre von der Seele (De Anima) sowie von den Untersuchungen zu Phänomenen, die Körper und Seele gemeinsam zukommen, wie z.B. Altern, Schlafen, Träumen (Parva Naturalia). Die Vorlesung gibt einen Überblick zu den wichtigsten Themen der Aristotelischen Biologie und zeigt im Einzelnen den Zusammenhang zwischen biologischer Naturforschung und Aristotelischer Philosophie.
Mi. 12:00 bis 14:00 c.t. Prof.-Huber-Pl. 2 (W) - LEHRTURM-W201

Fortgeschrittenenseminar - al-Farabi’s On Unity (Adamson, Hansberger)
Farabi, the most famous Aristotelian philosopher of the Islamic world prior to Avicenna, did not write any one work covering all the topics tackled in Aristotle’s Metaphysics. His ideas about metaphysics can however be gleaned from several different works, including a short treatise on the aims of the Metaphysics itself, and the treatise we will read in this seminar. Called On the One and on Unity (Fi l-wahda wa-l-wahid), it explains the different senses in which things can be called “one,” corresponding to a similar discussion in Aristotle. We will read the text in Arabic and translate into English, planning to get through not the entire text but at least the opening section.
Tu. 10:00 -12:00 c.t. MusaPh (Leopoldstr. 11b, 4. Stock, Raum 433)

Advanced Seminar and Essay-course. Aristotle and the Stoics on Emotions.
The aim of our class is to understand how Aristotle, on the one hand, and the Stoics, on the other, conceive of phenomena such as anger, joy, fear, or sadness. We will take a look at the strikingly different accounts that are given of these phenomena (while Aristotle emphasizes that emotions are always accompanied by pleasure or pain, the Stoics take them to be false judgements and excessive impulses). And we will discuss how these accounts relate to the authors’ background assumptions in fields such as the theory of the human soul and its relation to the body, the philosophy of action, of moral  responsibility, and of the virtues. In addition, we will consider the notorious ‘lists’ of emotions that we find in the works of both Aristotle and the Stoics. Finally, we will compare the Stoic ideal of the absence of emotions (apatheia) with Aristotle’s ideal of an appropriate emotional response. Do Aristotle and the Stoics mean something completely different when talking about the ‘pathē tēs psuchēs’ or do they offer different accounts of what is roughly the same kind of experience?
Wed. 10:00 - 12:00 c.t. Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 (E) - E 210

Advanced Seminar and Tutorium (Blockseminar) - Averroes’s Philosophical Theology and Its Graeco-Arabic Background (Di Giovanni)
Averroes of Cordoba (d. 1198), known in the Latin West as “the Commentator” of Aristotle, set out a sophisticated theory of God and the cosmic intelligences. His analysis unfolds as a meticulous exegesis of Aristotle, paying equal attention to textual -- or philological -- and philosophical detail, and further interweaving this exegesis with a subtle analysis of previous doctrines from both Greek (late ancient) and Arabic (medieval Islamic) Peripateticism. The seminar is offered in 4-hour compact sessions of discussion over the cross-lingual and transcultural tradition that is encapsulated in Averroes’s Epitome of Metaphysics. It consists of close reading of and commentary upon his overall hermeneutics in the area of pre-modern philosophical theology. Background knowledge of Aristotle’s philosophy required, with particular regard to the texts Aristotle's Physics, books 7-8, and book 12 of the Metaphysics.
Seminar Sa. 10:00 -14:00 s.t. 21.04.2018 -19.05.2018 Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 (M) - M 207
Tutorium Fr. 16:00 - 20:00 c.t. 20.04.2018 - 18.05.2018 Leopoldstr. 13,H1 - 1206

Winter Semester 2017-18 (16.10.2017-9.2.2018)

Musaph Research Oberseminar (Adamson, Lattmann)
Current research projects in ancient philosophy.
Di. 12-14 c.t. Leopoldstr. 11b, 4. Stock, Raum 433

Doktorandenkolloquium (Adamson)
Mo. 14-16 c.t. Leopoldstr. 11b, 4. Stock, Raum 433

Advanced Seminar - Levels and Limits of Nature: Matter, Form, Life and Action in Aristotle (Anagnostopoulos)
In this seminar, we will explore a series of questions about different levels of the natural world, and about the limits of the natural world and the study of nature. How does Aristotle account for the boundaries between living and non-living substances? How do living beings and their activities qualify as natural beings, whose functioning can be studied as part of natural science? How, and to what extent, is cognition a natural phenomenon subject to natural-scientific study? What is the bearing of human nature on our practical activity, e.g. as ethical agents? What distinguishes inanimate from living matter? We will begin with an examination of Aristotle’s conception of nature and the distinction between natural substances and artifacts, before turning to the application of natural-scientific frameworks to various special cases, especially kinds of life-processes, such as reproduction, nutrition, cognition, and action. We will orient ourselves through recent secondary literature on these topics (roughly one article per week). The course will be have two parts: a seminar in which new material is presented and discussed, and a discussion section, led by Marilu Papandreou, in which students discuss the issues at greater depth and/or, (only!) if there is interest, study the text in the original Greek, depending on the students. Knowledge of ancient Greek is therefore not a prerequisite, though it is always beneficial.
Di. 10-12 c.t. Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 (A) - A 020, Tutorium Mo. 12-14 Musaph Seminarraum.

Fortgeschrittenenseminar - Akademische Skepsis (Brüllmann)
Di. 14-16 c.t. Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 (E) - E 206

Vorlesung - Philosophie in der islamischen Welt (Adamson)
Diese Vorlesung bietet einen Überblick zu der lang anhaltenden und oft unterschätzten philosophischen Tradition der islamischen Welt. Hauptfiguren der Tradition, z.B. al-Kindi, al-Farabi, Avicenna, al-Ghazali, Averroes, Maimonides, Fakhr al-Din al-Razi und Mulla Sadra, werden anhand ihrer Hauptwerke diskutiert, auch im Hinblick auf den Einfluss der antiken Philosophie und religiöser Quellen. Es wird dafür plädiert, das Thema breit zu konzipieren, indem man nicht nur muslimische Autoren, sondern auch jüdische und christlich-arabische Philosophen einschließt. Das Verhältnis zwischen aristotelischer Philosophie (falsafa) und rationeller Theologie (kalam) wird auch thematisiert. Philosophische Themen, die besonders im Mittelpunkt stehen, sind Ethik, Ewigkeit des Universums, Intellekttheorie und göttliche Attribute.
Do. 12-14 c.t. Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 (D) - D 209

Advanced Seminar - An Arabic Philosophical Correspondence: the Questions and Answers of Miskawayh and al-Tawhidi (Adamson)
This seminar will be devoted to an exchange of questions and answers between two major authors of the tenth century AD: Miskawayh and al-Tawhidi. In the Hawamil wa-l-Shawamil (literally, Stray Cattle and Secure Enclosures), Tawhidi poses many philosophical queries which are then answered by Miskawayh – and often, the questions are as interesting as the answers. We will read selections from this work, alongside draft translations by Sophia Vasalou, who will visit the seminar to introduce the work.
Di. 10-12 c.t. Leopoldstr. 11b, 4. Stock, Raum 433

Adavnced Seminar - The Philosophy of Aquinas: A Reading of On Being an Essence (Di Giovanni)
Thomas Aquinas’s On Being and Essence (De ente et essentia) constitutes one of the most accomplished attempts in the history of Western thought to harmonize ancient metaphysics with the creationist dogma of the Abrahamitic traditions. In this treatise the Dominican master sets the foundation for his acclaimed theory of God as “Subsistent Being Itself” (Ipsum Esse Subsistens). Along the way, he engages in meaningful dialogue with major representatives of Islamic philosophy, true to his principle that wisdom is to be sought wherever it can be found, with no regard for confessional affiliations. The seminar aims at equipping students of Aquinas with a clear understanding of major lineaments of his metaphysical thought through close reading of On Being and Essence and against the background of other work in rational theology and natural philosophy
Do. 14-16 c.t. Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 (M) - M 101

Fortgeschrittenenseminar - al-Ghazālī, „Die Inkohärenz der Philosophen“ (Tahāfut al-falāsifa) (Hansberger)
In seiner Schrift „Die Inkohärenz der Philosophen“ widmet sich der große muslimische Theologe Abū Ḥāmid al-Ghazālī (gest. 1111 n. Chr.) einigen in seinen Augen irrtümlichen Lehren „der Philosophen“ (womit hauptsächlich Ibn Sīnā/Avicenna, gest. 1037 n. Chr., gemeint ist). Dabei geht es um Themen wie die Ewigkeit vs. Erschaffenheit der Welt, die Attribute Gottes, die Zweckhaftigkeit der Himmelsbewegung, die Möglichkeit einer leiblichen Auferstehung oder auch die Existenz eines Kausalzusammenhanges in der Natur. Al-Ghazālī unterzieht diese Lehren einer scharfen Kritik, wobei er sich selbst auch philosophischer Methoden bedient. Mit seiner Kritik geht es ihm nicht darum, philosophisches Denken als solches zurückzuweisen (wie es ihm oft angelastet wird), sondern darum, die Grenzen der philosophischen Erkenntnis genau auszuloten und darzulegen, von welchem Punkt an das Vertrauen in ihre Methoden in die Irre führen muss.
Im Seminar wollen wir einerseits einen Überblick über das gesamte Werk gewinnen und uns andererseits mit einigen der von al-Ghazālī diskutierten Themen im Detail auseinandersetzen, wobei wir sowohl die philosophischen Ausgangsthesen als auch al-Ghazālīs Kritik sowie seine eigenen Positionen einer genauen Analyse und Diskussion unterziehen werden. Das Seminar wird somit einen Einblick in grundlegende Themen der mittelalterlichen islamischen Philosophie geben, nebenbei aber auch in Grundpositionen der klassischen islamischen Theologie einführen und das Spannungsfeld zwischen Philosophie und Theologie beleuchten, in dem metaphysische und naturphilosophische Fragen in der islamischen Welt diskutiert wurden.
Fr. 10-12 c.t. Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 (E) - E 212

Übung - Philosophisches Arabisch: al-Ghazālī, „Tahāfut al-falāsifa“ (Hansberger)
Auszüge aus al-Ghazālīs Schrift „Die Inkohärenz der Philosophen“ („Tahāfut al-falāsifa“) werden im arabischen Original gelesen. Die Übung ist nicht nur für Teilnehmer des Fortgeschrittenenseminars „Al-Ghazālī, Die Inkohärenz der Philosophen“ gedacht, sondern steht allen Interessenten offen, die sich im Lesen arabischer philosophischer Texte üben wollen.
Fr. 12 - 14 c.t. Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 (A) - A 020

 

 

Summer Semester 2017

Oberseminar - Aristotle, Eudemian Ethics I.8 - II.11 (Rapp, Primavesi)

Chapters I.8 to II.11 of the Eudemian Ethics can be read as a continuous inquiry into the notions of the good and eudaimonia (happy life) and into virtue of character. They thus provide the philosophical core of Aristotle's presumably early work on moral philosophy, the Eudemian Ethics. Unfolding the concept of virtue of character Aristotle introduces the famous doctrine that all virtue is a mean; also, since virtue is thought to be a choice/decision involving state, Aristotle discusses voluntariness, involuntariness, accountabilty, wish/intention and choice. Drawing on a new working edition of the Greek text, we will discuss the treatise chapter by chapter. The seminar will be held in English
Di. 16:00 bis 18:00 c.t. MusaPH (Leopoldstr. 11b, 4. Stock, Raum 433)

Oberseminar - Ancient Philosophy: Research Seminar (Adamson, Primavesi, Rapp
Current research projects in ancient philosophy. Command of English and Ancient Greek.
Di. 12:00 bis 14:00 c.t. MusaPH (Leopoldstr. 11b, 4. Stock, Raum 433)

Kolloquium - Kolloquium für Habilitanden, Doktoranden, Magistranden, Masterstudenten (Rapp)
Vorstellung und Diskussion von Projekten der Teilnehmer. Die Diskussionen erfolgen sowohl in deutscher als auch in englischer Sprache. Presentation and discussion of the participants' current projects. The Discussions will be held either in German or in English.
Di. 18:00 bis 20:00 c.t. MusaPH (Leopoldstr. 11b, 4. Stock, Raum 433)

Advanced Seminar - Aristotle On Generation and Corruption (Anagnostopoulos)
In this course, held in English, we will read Aristotle's work On Generation and Corruption. This work deals primarily with the nature and behavior of the four "elements", the basic substances of the Aristotelian universe. Topics addressed include the distinction between generation and alteration, the eternity of generation and elemental change, the "matter" of the elements, the nature of mixture and affection. Some persistent controversies in scholarship on Aristotle which might be illuminated by this text include the debate about whether Aristotle endorsed a conception of prime matter, and if so, what this is, and how the elements fit in to Aristotle's teleological perspective. Throughout the course we will orient ourselves by reading recent secondary literature (roughly one article per week), which will be made available.
Do. 10:00 bis 12:00 c.t. woch 27.04.2017 bis 27.07.2017 Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 (E) - E 206

Advanced Seminar - Sextus Empiricus Outlines of Pyrrhonism (Adamson)
This seminar will be devoted to a key text of ancient Skepticism, the Outlines of Pyrrhonism. In this work Sextus, a doctor from the Empiricist school, explains the arguments by which the ancient skeptic seeks to induce “suspension of belief.” In addition to considering these arguments in detail, we will discuss the overall nature and aim of Pyrrhonic Skepticism, including the question of whether it aims to undermine all beliefs or only the technical sorts of belief advanced by rival philosophers. Texts will be read in Greek alongside the published English translation of Sextus will be made available. Participants will take it in turn to present the passages.
Mo. 12:00 bis 14:00 c.t. MusaPH (Leopoldstr. 11b, 4. Stock, Raum 433)

Advanced Seminar - Philosophy and Islamic Theology: al-Ashari (Adamson)
This seminar will be devoted to the most important single source for our knowledge of early Islamic theology, or kalam: the Maqalat of al-Ashari. In this sprawling work, the founder of the Asharite theological tradition explains the views of previous theologians. Along the way, many issues of philosophical interest are raised, having to do with physics (the atomic theory), logic and epistemology (attributes as related to their bearers, the nature of knowledge), and metaphysics (the free will debate). We will look selections from this work, alongside draft translations by David Bennett, who will visit the seminar to introduce the work. Participation in the seminar presupposes some knowledge of Arabic.
Di. 10:00 bis 12:00 c.t. MusaPH (Leopoldstr. 11b, 4. Stock, Raum 433)

Advanced Seminar - Anatomies of Rationality: Aristotle, Averroes, and Aquinas on the Unity of the Human Intellect (Di Giovanni)
Thomas Aquinas’s tract on the uniqueness of the intellect (De unitate intellectus contra Averroistas) marked a turning point in the history of Western civilization. With unprecedented alarm it denounced the breakdown that occurred, towards the end of the thirteenth century, in the ideal of a basic harmony between secular and religious teaching as pursued in Scholasticism. Christian religion taught that human souls are immortal and destined for an afterlife of reward or punishment. The evidence of rational investigation contradicted the thesis of personal immortality. The seminar focuses on this historic debate through a close scrutiny of Aquinas’s work and his defense of the immortality thesis. Concurrently it illuminates the philosophical background constituted by Aristotle’s psychology and its interpretation in the Islamic tradition, particularly the philosophy of Averroes.
Fr. 10:00 bis 12:00 c.t. woch 28.04.2017 bis 28.07.2017 Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 (E) - E 212

Reading Group - Averroes’s Decisive Treatise (Faṣl al-Maqāl) (Di Giovanni)
Course Description: By way of a complement to the seminar “Reason in Islam: Introduction to Islamic Theology and Philosophy”, the course features intensive reading of a classic of Islamic thought in the original text: the Decisive Treatise on the Harmony of Religion and Philosophy (Faṣl al-maqāl fī-mā bayna l-šarīʿa wa-l-falsafa min al-ittiṣāl) by Averroes of Cordoba (d. 1198). The text is a legal opinion establishing the legitimacy of philosophical investigation on Islamic principles. In fact, it even mandates the study of philosophy for all capable Muslims, presenting rational investigation as a distinct religious duty. In this sense the Treatise lays the foundations of an enlightened approach to religion of the kind that is advocated in the context of modern Islamic reformism. The texture of Averroes’s argument will be extracted from a close reading of the original text, attentive to its linguistic construction, and requiring weekly preparation from students with proficiency in Classical Arabic.
Fr. 14:00 bis 16:00 c.t. Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 (E) - E 212

Fortgeschrittenenseminar - Platons späte politische Philosophie (Timaios, Kritias, Politikos) (Geiger)
Wir werden uns in diesem Seminar mit einigen zentralen Texten und Themen von Platons später politischer Philosophie (also nach der Politeia) beschäftigen. Im Einzelnen geht es dabei um den Beginn des Timaios (Ti. 17a-27b), die Fragment gebliebene Atlantis-Erzählung im Kritias und schließlich um den Politikos. Im Rahmengespräch des Timaios erfahren wir, dass man sich am Vortag über die besten Verfassung unterhalten hat. Dabei hatte Sokrates Thesen formuliert, wie wir sie aus der Politeia kennen, v.a. aus den Büchern II-V. Interessanterweise scheint Sokrates diese Thesen weiterhin zu vertreten, aber er äußert nun den Eindruck, dass das darin sichtbare Modell einer besten Verfassung zu statisch sei und dass es sinnvoll wäre, den so konzipierten Staat in Aktion zu sehen. Etwas von der Art darzustellen, sieht Sokrates als außerordentlich schwierig an, aber genau das ist das Projekt, das die anwesenden Gesprächsteilnehmer zu Beginn des Timaios und dann im Kritias verfolgen. Wie dieses Projekt einer erweiterten politischen Theorie im Ganzen aussehen würde, wissen wir leider nicht, da der Kritias mitten im Satz abbricht, aber wir wollen versuchen, die Version, die uns vorliegt, so genau wie möglich zu beschreiben. Der Entwurf politischer Theorie, der uns im Politikos vorliegt, scheint diesen Weg nicht weitergehen zu wollen und von ganz anderer Natur zu sein. Diesen äußerst komplexen Neuentwurf nachzuvollziehen und in seinem Verhältnis zum Timaios-Kritias und zur Politeia zu bestimmen, wird uns in mindestens der Hälfte der Seminarsitzungen beschäftigen.
Di. 10:00 bis 12:00 c.t. woch 25.04.2017 bis 25.07.2017, Raum: MusaPH (Leopoldstr. 11b, 4. Stock, Raum 433)

 

 

Wintersemester 2016/2017

Oberseminar - Ancient Philosophy: Research Seminar (Adamson, Primavesi, Rapp)
Current research projects in ancient philosophy.
Di. 12:00 bis 14:00 c.t. woch 18.10.2016 bis 07.02.2017 Raum: MusaPH (Leopoldstr. 11b, 4. Stock, Raum 433)

Oberseminar - Aristotle's Metaphysics: The Middle Books (Part 3) (Primavesi, Rapp)
In this seminar we read and discuss Aristotle's Metaphysics starting from book VII (Z). After we have read books VII-VIII in the previous semesters, we will now proceed to book IX (Theta).
Command of English and Ancient Greek. Familiarity with the basics of Aristotelian philosophy.
Di. 16:00 bis 18:00 c.t. woch 18.10.2016 bis 07.02.2017 MusaPH (Leopoldstr. 11b, 4. Stock, Raum 433)

Fortgeschrittenenseminar - Aristoteles Kategorienschrift (Rapp)
Aristoteles’ "Kategorienschrift" ist einer der meist kommentierten Texte der Philosophiegeschichte. Für viele Jahrhunderte wurde er sogar als Einführung in die Philosophie benutzt. In dieser kurzen Schrift werden zunächst die Begriffe Substanz, Substrat, Akzidenz eingeführt. Dann wird die These aufgestellt, dass alles Seiende in eine von zehn Kategorien falle. Diese Kategorien werden dann einzeln vorgestellt und diskutiert. Im letzten Teil der Schrift (den "Postprädikamenten" = Kap. 10-15) werden dann vermischte Themen, wie die verschiedenen Gegensätze, Priorität, Gleichzeitigkeit und Bewegung abgehandelt. Mit dieser Thematik bewegt sich die Schrift im Schnittfeld zwischen Ontologie, Sprachphilosophie/Semantik und Logik. Aristoteles selbst macht von seiner Kategorienlehre an vielen Stellen seines Werks Gebrauch, u.a. um auf den Umstand aufmerksam zu machen, dass "seiend" ein Begriff ist, der in den verschiedenen Kategorien je Unterschiedliches meint, und dass Begriffe, wenn sie Entitäten in unterschiedlichen Kategorien bezeichnen, nicht dasselbe bedeuten können. Im Seminar wird ein griechisch-deutscher Text zur Verfügung gestellt. Von der Anschaffung der günstigen, aber völlig unbrauchbaren Reclam-Ausgabe des Textes kann abgesehen werden. Kenntnisse des Alt-Griechischen sind hilfreich, aber nicht erforderlich.
Mo. 16:00 bis 18:00 c.t. woch 17.10.2016 bis 06.02.2017 Amalienstr. 73A - Raum 211

Kolloquium für Habilitanden, Doktoranden, Magistranden, Masterstudenten (Rapp)
Vorstellung und Diskussion von Projekten der Teilnehmer. Die Diskussionen erfolgen sowohl in deutscher als auch in englischer Sprache. Presentation and discussion of the participants' current projects. The discussions will be held either in German or in English.
Di. 18:00 bis 20:00 c.t. woch 18.10.2016 bis 07.02.2017 Ort: MusaPH (Leopoldstr. 11b, 4. Stock, Raum 433)

Fortgeschrittenenseminar - Averroes on Islamic Theology (Adamson)
This seminar will be devoted to a short but important work in which Averroes assesses the Islamic theological tradition, entitled Exposition of Methods of Proof Concerning Religious Principles (al-Kashf ʿan Manāhij-l-adilla fī ʿaqāʾid-l-Milla). Passages from the work will be read from the original Arabic; discussion will be held in English.
Di. 10:00 bis 12:00 c.t. woch 18.10.2016 bis 07.02.2017 Musaph (Leopoldstr. 11b, 4. Stock, Raum 433)

Fortgeschrittenenseminar - Plato’s Phaedo and its Late Ancient Reception (Adamson)
This seminar will be devoted to one of Plato’s most famous dialogues, the Phaedo, in which Socrates spends his final moments discoursing with friends on the immortality of the soul. Two late ancient commentaries on this dialogue are preserved, by Olympiodorus and Damascius. This seminar will be devoted to the late ancient reception of the Phaedo, and will in alternating weeks read selected passages from Plato’s text, followed by readings from the late ancient commentaries on the Platonic source. Texts will be read in Greek, but English translations of both Plato and the commentaries will be made available. Participants will take it in turn to present the passages.
Mo. 12:00 bis 14:00 c.t. woch 17.10.2016 bis 06.02.2017 Musaph (Leopoldstr. 11b, 4. Stock, Raum 433)

Fortgeschrittenenseminar - The Problem of God’s Knowledge in Pagan, Islamic, and Christian Theologies (Di Giovanni)
God’s knowledge posed a fraught question. The results of rational investigation show that God as the most perfect being must know the most perfect object, which is God Himself in contradistinction to the lower world. At the same time, rational theologies and Abrahamic religions teach that God exerts providential care over mundane things and must, therefore, have some knowledge of wordly matters. The course explores major lineaments of the problematique and solutions elaborated within the three milieus of Greek, Arabic, and Latin scholasticisms. Readings and discussion will range over a selection of representative authors including Aristotle, Themistius, Avicenna, al-Ghazālī, Averroes, and Thomas Aquinas. Close analysis and philosophical discussion of the sources with emphasis on tracing the developments of the debate across the various cultural and linguistic contexts of philosophical theology.
Do. 16:00 bis 18:00 c.t. woch 20.10.2016 bis 09.02.2017 Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 (E) - E 212

Fortgeschrittenenseminar - Miskawayh’s Ethik (Hansberger)
Abū ʿAlī Miskawayhs Schrift „Tahḏīb al-Aḫlāq“ („Die Läuterung des Charakters“) ist eines der bedeutendsten Werke zur Ethik innerhalb der mittelalterlichen islamisch-arabischen Philosophie. Miskawayh (~932-1030 n. Chr.), Philosoph, Historiker und Literat, ist ein Repräsentant der höfischen Bildungselite seiner Zeit, der seine Vorliebe für die griechisch geprägte Philosophie mit einem breiten Interesse an anderen Wissenschaften und literarischen Künsten verbindet. In der „Läuterung des Charakters“ geht er der Frage nach, „wie wir uns eine charakterliche Disposition aneignen können, die solcherart ist, dass alle Taten, die aus ihr fließen, gut sind und zudem mit Leichtigkeit ausgeführt werden können“. Dazu, so Miskawayh, müsse man zunächst die Seele und ihre Vermögen verstehen. So geht es in seiner Schrift nicht nur um Themen wie das menschliche Glück, die Tugenden und ihren Erwerb, sondern auch um Prinzipien der Seelenlehre und die „Gesundheit der Seele“. Bei der Behandlung dieser Themen greift Miskawayh auf seine umfangreichen Kenntnisse seiner griechischen und arabischen Vorgänger zurück. Seine Ethik baut vornehmlich auf aristotelisches und (neu-)platonisches Gedankengut auf; er bindet in seine Synthese aber auch vielfältige andere Elemente ein. Im Seminar werden wir „Die Läuterung des Charakters“ (in engl. Übersetzung) in Auszügen lesen, analysieren und diskutieren, wobei hin und wieder auch andere Texte Miskawayhs hinzugezogen werden sollen. Ziel ist, diesen Text in seinem philosophiehistorischen Kontext kennenzulernen und zu verstehen, wie Miskawayh aus der (spät)antiken griechischen Philosophie überlieferte Ideen für seine eigene Zeit und Gesellschaft bearbeitet, ergänzt und fruchtbar macht.
Mi. 12:00 bis 14:00 c.t. woch 19.10.2016 bis 08.02.2017 Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 (E) - E 212  

Übung zu "Miskawayh’s Ethik" (= philosophisches Arabisch) (Hansberger)
Miskawayhs Schrift Tahdhīb al-Akhlāq wird auszugsweise im arabischen Original gelesen. Die Übung ist nicht nur für Teilnehmer des Fortgeschrittenenseminars „Miskawayhs Ethik" gedacht, sondern steht allen Interessenten offen, die sich im Lesen arabischer philosophischer Texte üben wollen.
Do. 12:00 bis 14:00 c.t. woch 20.10.2016 bis 09.02.2017 Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 (E) - E 212

Vorlesung - Nikomachische Ethik (Brüllmann)
Die Nikomachische Ethik des Aristoteles ist eine der interessantesten, einflussreichsten und meistdiskutierten Schriften zur praktischen Philosophie. In der Vorlesung werden wir uns erstens einen Überblick über dieses Werk verschaffen, wobei uns u.a. die folgenden Themen begegnen werden: das gute Leben, die menschliche Seele, die Tugenden des Charakters und des Verstandes, Gerechtigkeit, Freiwilligkeit und Verantwortung, Unbeherrschtheit, Lust, Freundschaft, Erziehung und Politik. Zweitens werden wir versuchen, die Nikomachische Ethik in ihren Kontext, d.h. in den Kontext der antiken Ethik und der Aristotelischen Philosophie einzuordenen. Drittens werden wir die wichtigsten Interpretationsprobleme und Debatten zu dieser Schrift kennenlernen. (Und wenn noch Zeit ist, werden wir uns viertens einige Gedanken dazu machen, wie sich die ethische Theorie des Aristoteles zu anderen Ansätzen der normativen Ethik verhält.)
Fr. 10:00 bis 12:00 c.t. woch 21.10.2016 bis 10.02.2017 Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 (M) - M 014

Fortgeschrittenenseminar und Übung - Antike Handlungstheorie (Brüllmann, Pfeiffer)
Auch wenn Handlungen kein eigenständiges Thema der antiken Philosophie darstellen, äußern sich antike Autoren in unterschiedlichen Kontexten zu Fragen, die wir heute der Handlungstheorie zuordnen würden. Dazu gehören: 1. Wie verhalten sich Wissen und Handeln zueinander? 2. Wie lassen sich motivationale Konflikte erklären? 3. Wie lassen sich Handlungen innerhalb eines naturphilosophischen Rahmens (einer allgemeinen Theorie der Bewegung) beschreiben? 4. Unter welchen Umständen können Handlungen als Ausdruck von Charaktereigenschaften gelten? 5. Wie passen (freie) Handlungen in ein deterministisches Weltbild?
Wir wollen diese und weitere Fragen mit Blick auf ausgewählte Philosophen (Sokrates, Platon, Aristoteles, Stoiker) diskutieren. Im Zentrum wird dabei die genaue und gemeinsame Textlektüre stehen. Darüber hinaus sollen aber auch klassische Aufsätze besprochen werden.
Mi. 14:00 bis 16:00 c.t. woch 19.10.2016 bis 08.02.2017 Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 (M) - M 209 und Mi. 16:00 bis 18:00 c.t. woch 19.10.2016 bis 08.02.2017 Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 (E) - E 212

Summer Semester 2016 (April 11 to July 15), 2016

        

Oberseminar - Ancient Philosophy: Research Seminar (Adamson, Primavesi, Rapp)
Current research projects in ancient philosophy.
Di. 12:00 bis 14:00 c.t. MusaPH (Leopoldstr. 11b, 4. Stock, Raum 433)

Oberseminar - Aristotle's Metaphysics: The Middle Books (Part II) (Primavesi, Rapp)
We will read and discuss Aristotle's Metaphysics starting from book VII, 13 (Z) on. This class continues a series of seminars held on Aristotle's Metaphysics. However, it is possible to join the seminar at the beginning of each semester.
Di. 16:00 bis 18:00 c.t. MusaPH (Leopoldstr. 11b, 4. Stock, Raum 433)

Übung zum Oberseminar "Aristotle's Metaphysics: The Middle Books (Part II)" (Pfeiffer)
Mo. 16:00 bis 18:00 c.t. MusaPH (Leopoldstr. 11b, 4. Stock, Raum 433)

Vorlesung - Frauen in der antiken und mittelalterlichen Philosophie (Adamson)
Der Beitrag der Frauen zu der Geschichte der Philosophie wird oft unterschätzt, insbesondere in der Vormoderne. Viele würden sich schwer tun, überhaupt eine weibliche Philosophin aus der Antike oder Mittelalter zu nennen. In dieser Vorlesung werden die Ideen von diesen Philosophinnen untersucht. Aus der Antike werden z.B. Frauen im Pythagoreanismus und die Neuplatonikerin Hypatia diskutiert, und auch die Rolle der Frauen in der frühen indischen Philosophie (u.a. die Darstellung der Frauen in den Upanisaden). In solchen Fällen soll auch erörtert werden, inwiefern die relevanten Quellen wirklich von philosophierenden Frauen berichten oder ob wir es eher mit pseudonymischen Werken von Männern zu tun haben. Im Mittelalter ist es weniger umstritten, dass zahlreiche Denkerinnen tätig waren, z.B. Hildegard von Bingen, Mechthilde von Magdeburg und Katharina von Siena. Neben einer Besprechung des Beitrags von Denkerinnen, sollen auch philosophische Ideen männlicher Denker über Frauen diskutiert werden, u.a. bei Platon, Aristoteles und Thomas von Aquin
Di. 14:00 bis 16:00 c.t. Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 (D) - D 209

Fortgeschrittenenseminar - Philosophy and its Methods in Fakhr al-Din al-Razi (Adamson)
Fakhr al-Din al-Razi (d.1210) is one of the most influential and sophisticated philosophers of the post-Avicennan age in the Islamic world. He wrote not only commentaries on Avicenna but also one of the greatest of all commentaries on the Quran, and a series of comprehensive theological and philosophical treatises whose detailed argumentation seems to apply the dialectical methods of Islamic theology (kalam) to a wide range of philosophical problems. This seminar, which will benefit from the presence of visiting scholar Frank Griffel, will examine Fakhr al-Din’s approach to philosophy through a close examination of passages from his works. These passages will be read in the original Arabic; the seminar will be held in English.
Di. 10:00 bis 12:00 c.t. MusaPH (Leopoldstr. 11b, 4. Stock, Raum 433)

Advanced Seminar - Plotinus on Time and Eternity (Adamson)
This seminar will be devoted to a close reading (in Greek) of Plotinus, Enneads 3.7 [45], On Time and Eternity. Discussion will include comparison of Plotinus’ views to other ancient texts on time and eternity, notably Plato’s Timaeus and Aristotle’s Physics book 4. Participants will take it in turn to translate passages (approximately one chapter of the treatise per week).
Mo. 12:00 bis 14:00 c.t. Raum: MusaPH (Leopoldstr. 11b, 4. Stock, Raum 433)

Fortgeschrittenenseminar - Alexander von Aphrodisias: De fato (Brüllmann)
Die Frage, ob und wie uns in einer kausal determinierten Welt Verantwortung für unser Handeln zugesprochen werden kann, gehört zu den wichtigsten, interessantesten und ältesten Themen der Philosophie. Die Schrift De fato des Aristoteles-Kommentators Alexander von Aphrodisias (um 200 n.Chr.) bietet die wohl umfassendste Auseinandersetzung mit diesem Thema, die uns aus der Antike überliefert ist. In dieser Schrift argumentiert Alexander aus aristotelischer Perspektive gegen den Determinismus und Kompatibilismus der Stoa. In unserem Seminar werden wir den nicht immer einfachen Text von De fato gründlich lesen und diskutieren. Außerdem werden wir versuchen, die Stoische Position (für die De fato eine wichtige Quelle darstellt) zu rekonstruieren und den aristotelischen Anleihen in Alexanders Argument nachzugehen. Nicht zuletzt wollen wir De fato zu den modernen Debatten um Freiheit und Determinismus in Beziehung setzen.
Mi. 14:00 bis 16:00 c.t. Kaulbachstr. 45 - 004

Advanced Seminar - Gems of “Eastern Wisdom”: The Conquest of Knowledge in Ibn Ṭufayl’s Alive, Son of the Awake (Di Giovanni)
The Spanish philosopher Muḥammad Ibn Ṭufayl (Abubacer, d. 1185) promises to disclose “the secrets of the Eastern wisdom” by firing up its seekers with “a brief glimpse of the road that lies ahead.” What he provides is a brilliant, superbly crafted tale recounting the story of a self-taught philosopher by the suggestive name of “Alive, Son the Awake” who, by the sole use of natural reason, arrives at the loftiest truths about the world, the self, and God. Alive, Son the Awake constitutes a pocket exposition of all of Graeco-Arabic philosophy, clothed in an exquisite virtuoso piece of artistic writing that is addressed to the general public as much as professional philosophers and literati. At the same time, the novel draws a rich tapestry of Islamic culture and society at the crucial space/time coordinates of its encounter with the West. The course addresses the various layers that constitute the story of Alive through reading and analysis, situating the work and problematique in its historical and philosophical context.
Mi. 18:00 bis 20:00 c.t. Leopoldstr. 13, H1 - 1208
Übung Mi. 10:00 bis 12:00 Amalienstr. 73/room 103

Vorlesung - 2400 Jahre Aristoteles (Primavesi, Rapp)
Aristoteles wurde nach antiken Quellen im Jahr 384 v.Chr. geboren, so dass sich im Jahr 2016 n.Chr. sein Geburtstag zum 2.400sten Mal jähren müsste (denn: 384 + 2.016 = 2.400). Aus diesem Anlass finden in diesem Jahr überall auf der Welt Jubiläumskonferenzen statt. Unser Beitrag zu diesen Aktivitäten ist eine Überblicksvorlesung zu Aristoteles, die den Philosophen zugleich aus Sicht der Philosophie und der Klassischen Philologie beleuchten soll. Das bedeutet, dass neben den philosophischen Grundthemen der Aristotelischen Philosophie (Ethik, Politische Theorie, Logik, Argumentationstheorie, Wissenschaftstheorie, Theorie der Seele, Metaphysik, Handlungstheorie, Anthropologie) auch die Quellen zum Leben des Aristoteles, die Zusammensetzung seines (nur zum Teil erhaltenen) Werks, die Überlieferung seiner Schriften, usw. behandelt werden sollen.
Mo. 18:00 bis 20:00 c.t. Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 (M) - M 218

Kolloquium für Habilitanden, Doktoranden, Magistranden, Masterstudenten
Vorstellung und Diskussion von Projekten der Teilnehmer. Die Diskussionen erfolgen sowohl in deutscher als auch in englischer Sprache. Presentation and discussion of the participants' current projects. The Discussions will be held either in German or in English.
Di. 18:00 bis 20:00 c.t. MusaPH (Leopoldstr. 11b, 4. Stock, Raum 433)

Winter Semester 2015-16

Oberseminar - Ancient Philosophy Research Seminar (Adamson, Primavesi, Rapp)
Current research projects in ancient philosophy. Command of English and Ancient Greek required.
Di. 12:00 bis 14:00 c.t. MusaPH (Leopoldstr. 11b, 4. Stock, Raum 433)

Oberseminar Aristotle's Metaphysics: The Middle Books (Part I) (Primavesi, Rapp)
We will read and discuss Aristotle's Metaphysics starting from book VII (Z) Command of English and Ancient Greek required.
Di. 16:00 bis 18:00 c.t. MusaPH (Leopoldstr. 11b, 4. Stock, Raum 433)

Discussion Section for the Oberseminar "Aristotle's Metaphysics: The Middle Books (Part I)" (Pfeiffer)
Mo. 14:00 bis 16:00 c.t. MusaPH (Leopoldstr. 11b, 4. Stock, Raum 433)

Advanced Seminar - Proclus' Elements of Theology" (Adamson)
A key work of later Neoplatonism, the "Elements of Theology (Stoicheiōsis theologikē)" by Proclus offers a construction of Platonist metaphysics using an axiomatic Euclidean mathematical structure. In this seminar, we will read selections of this work in the original Greek, discussing Proclus' argumentation and the relation of the "Elements" to earlier versions of Platonism in antiquity.
Mo. 12:00 bis 14:00 c.t. MusaPH (Leopoldstr. 11b, 4. Stock, Raum 433)

Advanced Seminar - The "Harmony of the Two Philosophers" ascribed to al-Farabi (Adamson)
One of the most familiar and influential ideas of late antiquity wasthat Plato and Aristotle agreed in all the fundamentals of their philosophy. This idea (called "perfectly crazy," but fruitful, by Richard Sorabji) lived on in the Arabic-speaking world, and was explicitly defended in a work called "Harmony of the Two Sages." This is ascribed to al-Farabi, though doubts have been raised about its authenticity in recent literature. In this seminar we will read selections of the text in the original Arabic and discuss the philosophical viewpoint taken by the author; ideally, it will also be decided by the end of the seminar whether Farabi is in fact the author.
Di. 10:00 bis 12:00 c.t. woch 13.10.2015 bis 02.02.2016 MusaPH (Leopoldstr. 11b, 4. Stock, Raum 433)

Advanced Seminar and Discussion Section - Ancient Moral Psychology (Anagnostopoulos, Noble)
How does a conception of the good figure in moral deliberation and action. What kinds of desires play a role in them and how do they do so? Can these desires conflict with one another in the moral agent? In what sense can we be motivated by reason to act morally? What is distinctive about moral deliberation in comparison with other kinds of thinking? Do we ever act contrary to our beliefs, and if so, what explains this fact? What conclusions can we draw about the structure of the mind on the basis on moral decision making? In this course we will examine ancient philosophers’ answers to these and other questions about the relationship between human psychology and ethical behavior and understanding. We will engage in a close reading of ancient texts in translation together with discussion of selected scholarly literature - roughly one article each week. The course will focus on the theories of Socrates, Plato and Aristotle. Some previous coursework in ancient philosophy is recommended. All readings and discussion will be conducted in English. Knowledge of ancient Greek is not required.
Do. 12:00 - 14:00 and 14:00 --16:00 c.t. (Discussion Session) c.t. 15.10.2015 bis 04.02.2016 Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 (E) - E 206

Fortgeschrittenenseminar - Al-Fārābīs Lehre vom Intellekt (Hansberger)
In der Philosophie des Abū Naṣr al-Fārābī (ca. 870-950 n. Chr.) kommt dem Begriff des „Intellekts“ in mehrfacher Hinsicht zentrale Bedeutung zu. Nicht nur ist er das Vermögen, das den Menschen im Besonderen auszeichnet, da er ihn als einziges Lebewesen zum Denken befähigt; auch das oberste Seinsprinzip, „das Erste“, ist selbst Intellekt und steht an der Spitze einer Reihe von himmlischen Intellekten, die die Grundstruktur der kosmischen Ordnung bilden.In seiner Schrift „Über den Intellekt“, der als primäre Textgrundlage des Seminars dienen wird, geht al-Fārābī der Frage nach, auf welche unterschiedlichen Arten das Wort „Intellekt“ gebraucht wird. Der allgemeine Sprachgebrauch wird dabei ebenso einer Betrachtung unterzogen wie derjenige der zeitgenössischen muslimischen Theologen. Vor allem aber bezieht sich al-Fārābī auf die Intellektlehre des Aristoteles. Er greift die Diskussion auf, die sich an dessen kryptischen Aussagen über den „aktiven Intellekt“ („De Anima“ III.5) entzündet hatte, und entwickelt im Rahmen einer Interpretation des Aristoteles seine eigenen Gedanken zur Intellektlehre.
Mi. 14:00 bis 16:00 c.t. Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 (E) - E 212

Vorlesung - Aristoteles' Rhetorik (Rapp)
Aristoteles' Werk "Rhetorik" bietet die erste systematische Argumentationstheorie und stellt dabei wichtige Verknüpfungen mit Teilen seiner Philosophie hier. Die wichtigste Idee ist die, dass Rhetorik auf Dialektik - der philosophischen Methode zur Prüfung von Thesen jeglicher Art - beruht. Außerdem enthält die Rhetorik die erste systematische Entwicklung einer Theorie der Emotionen. Schließich ist die Rhetorik auch als Quelle für die praktischen Philosophie (Ethik, Politik, Moral Psychology) des Aristoteles bedeutsam.
Mi. 16:00 bis 18:00 c.t. Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 (M) - M 218

Discussion Section - Questions & Answers on Aristotle's Rhetoric (Rapp)
Questions and answers on the content of my lecture "Aristoteles, Rhetorik" in English.
Two-hours sessions (6-8 pm) will be held on Oct. 28th, Nov. 11th, Dec. 2nd, Dec. 16th, Jan. 13th, Jan. 27th, Feb. 3rd. Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 (E) - E 206

Fortgeschrittenenseminar - Aristoteles Politik (Rapp)
Aristoteles’ Schrift Politik gilt als einer der Grundtexte der politischen Philosophie und der politischen Theorie. Wichtige Strömungen der politischen Philosophie im 20. Jahrhundert versuchen explizit, an Aristoteles’ Schrift anzuknüpfen. Oft wird an Aristoteles’ politischem Denken hervorgehoben, dass es – anders als viele moderne Ansätze – unmittelbar an das Ziel der Ethik, nämlich der Bestimmung des glücklichen Lebens, anknüpft und dieses auf die politische Ebene überträgt. Bei näherer Betrachtung zeigt sich allerdings, dass die Aristotelische Schrift eine durchaus komplexe Theorie, bestehend aus mehreren eigenständigen Ansätzen, enthält. Im Seminar soll diesen Ansätzen im Einzelnen nachgegangen werden: Herrschafts- und Gemeinschaftsformen, Erwerbskunde, Verfassungslehre und -kritik, politische Tugenden, Gerechtigkeit in der Polis, Aufbau, Erhalt und Zerstörung unterschiedlicher Staatsformen, Idealstaatsentwurf und Erziehung.
Mo. 16:00 bis 18:00 c.t. Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 (A) - 214

Kolloquium - Doktorandenkolloquium (Rapp)
Di. 18:00 bis 20:00 c.t. MusaPH (Leopoldstr. 11b, 4. Stock, Raum 433)

 

Summer Semester 2015 (April 13 - July 17)

Oberseminar - Aristotle, Metaphysics Lambda (Book XII) (Adamson, Primavesi, Rapp)
Di. 12:00 bis 14:00 c.t. woch 14.04.2015 bis 14.07.2015 Leopoldstr. 11B - 433
We will read and discuss Aristotle's "Metaphysics Lambda" (i.e. Book XII of the "Metaphysics"). This treatise is dedicated to an inquiry into ousia (substance). In its first five chapters Aristotle attempts to give an account of the principles of alterable and sensible substance. From chapter six onwards he turns to a more controversial type of substance, which is required to be without any alteration or motion. In the course of the following chapters this immovable type of substance is identified with the first unmoved mover which again is argued to be the first principle of everything. In a way, then, the treatment of the first unmoved mover concludes the overall project of Aristotle’s entire "Metaphysics", which he himself characterized as an inquiry into the first causes and principles. It also represents (essential parts of) Aristotle’s philosophical theology and provides important insights into his astronomy. The seminar will be held in English; knowledge of Ancient Greek is required

Oberseminar - Alexander of Aphrodisias' Metaphysics Commentary in Averroes (Adamson, Di Giovanni, Primavesi)
Di. 14:00 bis 16:00 c.t. woch Ort: MusaPH, Leopoldstr. 11b - Raum 426
This seminar, which continues from two previous semesters of work, concentrates on the fragments of Alexander of Aphrodisias' otherwise lost commentary on Book Lambda of the Metaphysics, which are preserved in Arabic in the Metaphysics commentary of Averroes. Each fragment is discussed with reference to the underlying Aristotelian passage and Averroes' response to Alexander, with attention given to both philological and philosophical aspects of the material. Arabic competence is not required for participation in the seminar; discussion is held in English

Doktorandenkolloquium (Rapp)
Di. 18:00 bis 20:00 c.t. woch 14.04.2015 bis 14.07.2015 Leopoldstr. 11B - 433

Fortgeschrittenenseminar - Aristotelian Emotions (Rapp)
Mi. 14:00 bis 16:00 c.t. woch 15.04.2015 bis 15.07.2015 Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 (D) - D Z005
Nowadays the theory of emotions and of related moral-psychological phenomena became one of the most flourishing fields of philosophy. One of the milestones within the development of this new branch of philosophy was the discovery of ‘cognitive’ accounts of emotions, i.e. the ideas that emotions are crucially connected with cognitive efforts, such as opinions, judgments, memory, anticipation, and that emotions themselves can be seen as expressing evaluative judgments. In philosophy, such ideas derive, to a considerable extent, from the interpretation of Aristotle; for Aristotle seems to be the first who systematically laid bare the connections between our attitudes towards certain objects and the individuation of various types of emotions. In the seminar we will read and discuss selected passages from Aristotle’s De Anima, Rhetoric, Nicomachean Ethics and Poetics.

Vorlesung: Aristoteles, Poetik (Primavesi)
Do. 10:00 bis 12:00 c.t. woch 16.04.2015 bis 16.07.2015 Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 (B) - B 106
7In der Vorlesung werden die wichtigsten Kapitel der Poetik interpretiert. Komplementär zum Verständnis des Textes ist das Hauptseminar zu verstehen.

Hauptseminar: Textkritische Übung zu Aristoteles, Poetik (Primavesi)
Do. 14:00 bis 16:00 c.t. woch 16.04.2015 bis 16.07.2015 Leopoldstr. 11A + B - 433
Dieses Hauptseminar versteht sich als textkritische Komplementärveranstaltung zur Aristoteles-Vorlesung. Nach einer Einführung in die methodischen Grundlagen der Textkritik wollen wir uns anhand ausgewählter Einzelstellen ein Urteil über zwei kritische Textausgaben der Poetik bilden, nämlich die Edition von R. Kassel aus dem Jahre 1965 und die Edition von L. Tarán und D. Gutas aus dem Jahre 2012. Anmerkung: Griechischkenntnisse im Umfang des Graecum werden für diesen Kurs vorausgesetzt.

Fortgeschrittenenseminar - Aristotle on Nature and Causes: Physics II in the original Greek. (Anagnostopoulos)
Do. 16:00 bis 18:00 c.t. woch 16.04.2015 bis 16.07.2015 Raum: MusaPH (Leopoldstr. 11b, 4. Stock, Raum 433)
In this seminar, held primarily in English (presentations and contributions in German are welcome) we will focus primarily on the Greek text of Aristotle's Physics, book II. The central topics include: the definition of nature (phusis), the status of form and matter as natural principles, the fourfold division of causes, luck and the accidental, and natural teleology. In addition to the Greek text, we will occasionally have a look at some recent secondary literature. Students should be prepared to offer one presentation (either on the translation of the Greek text or on a piece of secondary literature).

Fortgeschrittenenseminar - Boethius' Theological Tractates (Adamson)
Mo. 12:00 bis 14:00 c.t. woch 13.04.2015 bis 13.07.2015 Raum: MusaPH (Leopoldstr. 11b, 4. Stock, Raum 433)
Boethius is well known as the author of the "Consolation of Philosophy," but he also wrote several theological treatises, which became highly influential in the middle ages. In these treatises he applies the tools of Aristotelian logic and metaphysics to the question of God's nature and His relation to the universe. We will read the two most influential treatises, De Hebdomadibus and On the Trinity, both of which were for instance commented upon by Thomas Aquinas. The texts will be read in Latin but an English translation will also be made available. Text and translation: Boethius, Theological Tractates and Consolation of Philosophy, trans. H.F. Stewart E.K. Rand, and S.J. Tester (London: 1973).

Fortgeschrittenenseminar - Suhrawardi (Adamson)
Di. 10:00 bis 12:00 c.t. woch 14.04.2015 bis 14.07.2015 Ort: MusaPH, Leopoldstr. 11b - Raum 426
In this seminar we will read a work by Suhrawardi, the founder of the Ishraqi ("Illuminationist") tradition of philosophy in the Islamic world, concentrating on the transition from his earlier "Peripatetic" philosophy to the Ishraqi system. We will read the original Arabic text and discuss its linguistic and philosophical features. Text: Suhrawardī, al-Muqāwamāt, in H. Corbin, Oeuvres philosophiques et mystiques, 3 vols (Tehran: 1876-77), vol.1, 123-92.

Fortgeschrittenenseminar - The Islamic Afterlife of Aristotle’s Metaphysics (Di Giovanni)
Do. 16:00 bis 18:00 c.t. woch 16.04.2015 bis 16.07.2015 Amalienstr. 73A - 218
The course features some of the most representative documents on the Metaphysics written in Arabic: commentaries, paraphrases, epitomes, and other elaborations based on the work of Aristotle. Through a selection of pertinent readings a thematic path will be traced into fundamental questions debated by Islamic thinkers in reference to the Aristotelian text, such as the nature and method of metaphysics, the kinds and numbers of metaphysical principles, the finiteness of causal chains. Selected authors include Abū Yūsuf Yaʿqūb al-Kindī (d. after 870), Abū ʿAlī ibn Sīnā (d. 1037), and ʿAbd al-Laṭīf al-Baġdādī (d. 1231). All texts will be read in the original language and subjected to textual and linguistic analysis alongside philosophical discussion and doctrinal evaluation. Knowledge of Classical Arabic at an intermediate level, or higher, is required.

Fortgeschrittenenseminar und Essaykurs - Erinnerung, Vorstellungskraft und Traum bei Avicenna und in der griechisch-arabischen Überlieferung (Hansberger)
Do. 10:00 bis 12:00 c.t. woch 16.04.2015 bis 16.07.2015 Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 (E) - E 210
Warum bleiben uns Dinge, die wir wahrgenommen haben, im Gedächtnis, so dass wir sie uns in Erinnerung rufen können? Warum können wir uns andererseits auch Dinge vorstellen, die wir noch nie gesehen haben oder die es gar nicht gibt? Und was passiert, wenn wir träumen — wobei ja ähnliche Vorgänge abzulaufen scheinen, jedoch ohne dass wir sie bewusst steuern können? Wie und wodurch werden all diese geistigen Funktionen ausgeübt? Und in welcher Beziehung stehen sie zu unserer Fähigkeit, rational zu denken?
Mit diesen Fragen beschäftigte sich Avicenna (arabisch Ibn Sīnā, gest. 1037 n. Chr.) eingehend in mehreren seiner zahlreichen Schriften. Dabei konnte er auf eine zweifache antike Überlieferung zurückgreifen: Sowohl die griechischen Philosophen (allen voran Aristoteles) als auch die griechischen Ärzte und Anatomen (zu nennen wäre vor allem Galen) waren von diesen geistigen Funktionen fasziniert gewesen. Als Arzt und Philosoph war Avicenna daher besonders gut positioniert, um sich diesem Thema zu nähern. Tatsächlich entwickelte er ein ausgeklügeltes und philosophiegeschichtlich sehr einflussreiches System von fünf geistigen Vermögen, „innere Sinne“ genannt, mit dem er geistige Funktionen wie Vorstellen, Erinnern und Träumen (und andere mehr) erklären konnte.
Im Seminar werden wir uns intensiv mit der Avicennischen Theorie der „inneren Sinne“ auseinandersetzen. Außerdem werden wir den antiken und spätantiken geistesgeschichtlichen Hintergrund des Themas beleuchten, um zu verstehen, warum die genannten geistigen Funktionen gerade durch das Zusammentreffen von Philosophie und Anatomie problematische Fragen aufwarfen. Beachtung soll weiterhin die vom griechischen Original stark abweichende arabische Fassung von Aristoteles’ „Parva Naturalia“ finden, die philosophiegeschichtlich hier eine entscheidende Rolle gespielt zu haben scheint.

Fortgeschrittenenseminar und Essaykurs - Sein und Werden: Parmenides und Heraklit (Thanassas)
Mo. 18:00 bis 20:00 c.t. woch 13.04.2015 bis 13.07.2015 Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 (E) - E 212
Parmenides und Heraklit wurden von Platon zu Antipoden stilisiert: Jener behaupte eine All-Einheit des Seins und negiere mit seinem rigiden Monismus die Welt, während dieser umgekehrt mit seiner Flusslehre jede Konstante in Frage stelle. Dieses antithetische Verhältnis wurde oft hinterfragt, ebenso aber bekräftigt durch die Annahme, dass der angeblich spätere Parmenides in einigen seiner Fragmente Heraklit scharf kritisiere. Am anderen Ende der Tradition steht Martin Heidegger, dessen eigenwillige Auslegungen von der Annahme ausgingen, dass beide Denker „dasselbe“ sagen, also ausschließlich das eine Sein denken und benennen. Wir werden diese Auslegungsperspektiven in Kenntnis nehmen, zugleich aber versuchen, hinter ihnen den beiden Denkern in ihrer Eigenheit näherzukommen und sie als die beiden wichtigsten und auch originellsten Gestalten der Frühgriechischen Philosophie auffassen.

 

Winter Semester 2014-15 (Oct. 6 - Jan. 29)

Oberseminar - Theophrastus, Metaphysics (Adamson, Primavesi, Rapp)
We will read and discuss the treatise "Metaphysics" by Theophrastus. In this brief treatise Theophrastus, a student of Aristotle's, inquires into what he calls the first priniciples. The style and purpose of this work often resembles parts of Aristotle's "Physics" and "Metaphysics" (in particular, it takes up questions that were discussed in Aristotle's famous book Lambda of the "Metaphysics"). The treatise also refers to many positions that were held by members of Plato's Academy; it thus became an important source for the reconstruction of early Academic and Peripatetic theories. The seminar will be held in English; knowledge of Ancient Greek is required

Fortgeschrittenenseminar - Aristoteles, Über die Bewegung der Lebewesen (De Motu Animalium) (Rapp)
In der kleinen Schrift "De Motu Animalium" unternimmt es Aristoteles, die Prinzipien der Fortbewegung aller Lebewesen darzulegen. Damit ein Lebewesen sich fortbewegen kann, bedarf es nach Aristoteles bestimmter äußerer und innerer Ruhepunkte; außerdem braucht das Lebewesen ein unterscheidendes Vermögen, wie z.B. die Sinneswahrnehmung oder das das Denken, sowie schließlich die Fähigkeit, nach dem für gut Befundenen zu streben. In einer der allgemeinen Formeln, die Aristoteles für die Fortbewegung gibt, heißt es daher, dass die Fortbewegung immer drei Elemente erfordere: Ein unbewegt Bewegendes (z.B. der erstrebte Gegenstand), ein bewegt Bewegendes (z.B. das Streben, das durch ein für gut befundenes Objekt in Bewegung gesetzt wird) und ein Bewegtes (der sich bewegende Körper des Lebewesens). Aristoteles erörtert, inwiefern dieselbe Trias von Unbewegt-Bewegendem, Bewegt-Bewegendem und Bewegtem auch bei der Bewegung des Kosmos gegeben ist. Außerdem befasst er sich mit der Physiologie des Strebens (körperliche Erwärmung, Abkühlung, Leistung des Pneumas, Funktion der Gelenke) und mit dem internen Ausgangspunkt der Bewegung: der Seele. Auf diese Weise vereint die Schrift "De Motu Animalium" auf einzigartige Weise Aspekte von Handlungstheorie, Theorie der Seele und des Körpers, Zoologie, Metaphysik und Kosmologie.

Vorlesung - Antike Philosophie der Lebenskunst (Rapp)
In maßgeblichen Strömungen der antiken Philosophie wurde das Philosophieren nicht primär als Theorie, sondern als eine Art von Praxis und insbesondere auch als eine Lebensform verstanden. Von der Philosophie wurde erwartet, dass sie uns dabei unterstützt, ein glückliches Leben zu führen, und dass das Philosophieren selbst ein wichtiger Teil der geglückten Lebensführung darstellt. Unter "Lebenskunst" versteht man in diesem Zusammenhang die Fähigkeit und die Bemühung, durch eine reflektierte, in der Regel Philosophie-basierte Lebensführung ein besseres Leben zu erlangen.
Die Vorlesung untergliedert sich in drei Hauptteile: Zuerst soll der Gedanke der Philosophie als Lebenskunst bei Sokrates und den frühen Sokratikern (den Kyrenaikern, den Kyniker und den Megarikern) nachgewiesen werden. Sodann soll die spezifische Ausprägung einer Philosophie der Lebenskunst bei Epikur erörtert werden. Schließlich soll - stellvertretend für die Schule der Stoa - anhand des Philosophen Epiktet eine stoische Variante der Lebenskunstphilosophie vorgestellt werden.

Oberseminar - Averroes, Long Commentary on Metaphysics Lambda and Alpha Elatton
Tues. 14:00 - 16:00 Leopoldstr. 11b - Raum 433
The so-called "Long Commentary" of the great Muslim commentator Averroes (d.1198) is a major text in the history of philosophy, for several reasons. Most obviously, it contains brilliant and incisive discussion of the meaning of Aristotle's text. Also it preserves further commentary from earlier thinkers, particularly otherwise lost material from the greatest ancient commentator on Aristotle, Alexander of Aphrodisias. Finally, the Arabic text can be used as a witness for the textual tradition of the Metaphysics itself. In this seminar we will examine the Long Commentary on Book Lambda, in which Aristotle presents his philosophical treatment of immaterial substances, including God; and then move on to his commentary on Alpha Elatton, which for Averroes was the first book of Aristotle's Metaphysics. An English translation of Averroes' Commentary on Book Lambda can be found in: C. Genequand, Ibn Rushd's Metaphysics (Leiden: 1984). See also Averroes' Epitome of the Metaphysics: R. Arnzen, Averroes: On Aristotle's Metaphysics (Berlin 2010). This is a continuation of a seminar already begun in SoSe 2014, hence we will begin in the midst of the commentary on Lambda.

Advanced Seminar - Plotinus Enneads VI.8
One of the greatest treatises in Plotinus' Enneads is 6.8, "On Free Will and the Will of the One." Here Plotinus sets out to discover the sense in which the First Principle, or One, is "free" or "wills" the production of all other things. For a Greek-English facing page edition and translation see vol.7 of the Loeb series of Plotinus volumes, by A.H. Armstrong (published by Harvard University Press).
And for background see E. Eliasson, The Notion of “That Which Depends on Us in Plotinus and its Background (Leiden: 2008). This is a continuation of a seminar already begun in SoSe 2014, hence we will begin in the midst of the treatise. The seminar will mostly be taught in English but participants who would rather discuss and translate in German are also welcome. However participation requires some facility with Ancient Greek, as participants will take it in turns to present the text.

Advanced Seminar with Reading Session - Ancient Theories of Psychology (Pfeiffer, Noble)
What is a soul? How are souls related to bodies? Is there just one type of soul, or do souls differ in kind? In what sense, if any, do souls have parts? Are souls immortal, or can they come into and go out of existence? In this course we will survey ancient philosophers’ answers to these and other questions about the nature and basic operations of soul through a close reading of ancient texts in translation together with selected scholarly literature. Particular attention will be paid to the explanatory function of souls in ancient psychology and cosmology, and to systematic considerations used by ancient philosophers to argue for their preferred account of soul’s nature and constitution. This course will focus in the first instance on Plato’s and Aristotle’s theories of soul, with some attention being paid to the Presocratic antecedents of their theories as well as to subsequent developments in the Hellenistic Period (Stoics, Epicureans) and Late Antiquity (Neoplatonism). Previous coursework in ancient philosophy is recommended. All readings and discussion will be in English. Course participants should read the following article, which provides a helpful overview the topics to be discussed in the course, in advance of the first meeting: Lorenz, Hendrik, "Ancient Theories of Soul", The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy http://plato.stanford.edu/archives/sum2009/entries/ancient-soul.  

Fortgeschrittenenseminar - Ibn Bajja's "Governance of the Solitary" (read in original Arabic) (Adamson)
Tues. 10:00 - 12:00 Leopoldstr. 11b - Raum 433
Ibn Bajja (d. 1139) was, along with Ibn Tufayl and Averroes, one of the three great Muslim thinkers responsible for a blossoming of Aristotelian philosophy in Muslim-controlled Spain in the 12th century. This seminar will be devoted to his best-known, though still rarely studied, work "Governance of the Solitary," which relates closely to the philosophy of al-Farabi. We will read the original Arabic text and discuss its linguistic and philosophical features. Literatur: Ibn Bajja (Avempace), La conduite de l'isolé et deux autres épîtres, ed. and trans. C. Genequand (Paris: Vrin, 2010). Voraussetzungen: The seminar will mostly be taught in English but participants who would rather discuss and translate in German are also welcome. However participation requires some facility with Arabic, as participants will take it in turns to present the text.

Fortgeschrittenenseminar und Essaykurs - Al-Farabi, Die Prinzipien der Ansichten der Bewohner der vortrefflichen Stadt (Hansberger)
Abū Naṣr al-Fārābī (ca. 870-950 n. Chr.) ist einer der bedeutendsten und einflussreichsten Köpfe der arabisch-islamischen Philosophietradition. Genannt der „zweite Lehrer“ (nach dem „ersten Lehrer“ Aristoteles), bestimmte er mit seiner spezifischen Art der Aneignung, Interpretation und Weiterentwicklung des griechischen philosophischen Erbes maßgeblich die Richtung, welche die Philosophie in der islamischen Welt einschlagen sollte. Die Prinzipien der Ansichten der Bewohner der vortrefflichen Stadt ist eines der bekanntesten Werke al-Fārābīs. In ihm legt er dar, welche philosophischen Standpunkte in einer idealen Gesellschaft zu bestimmten Fragen vertreten werden sollten – wie der Frage nach Gott, nach der Ordnung des Kosmos und der materiellen Welt, nach der Stellung und den besonderen Fähigkeiten des Menschen, nach der bestmöglichen menschlichen Gesellschaft, sowie nach dem Verhältnis von Religion und Philosophie. Mit diesem Katalog greift al-Fārābī Themen auf, die in der zeitgenössischen Theologie als „Grundlagen der Religion“ diskutiert wurden. Das heißt allerdings nicht, dass die Prinzipien eine theologische Schrift wären. Im Gegenteil macht al-Fārābī deutlich, dass diese Themen in erster Linie Gegenstand philosophischer Erkenntnis sind; die Aufgabe der Religion besteht hingegen darin, dieselben Inhalte in symbolischer und gleichnishafter Form an solche Menschen zu vermitteln, die der philosophischen Erkenntnis nicht fähig sind.

Kolloquium für Habilitanden, Doktoranden, Magistranden, Masterstudenten (Rapp)
Vorstellung und Diskussion von Projekten der Teilnehmer. Die Diskussionen erfolgen sowohl in deutscher als auch in englischer Sprache

Übung - Philosophisches Arabisch: Al-Fārābī, Mabādiʾ ārāʾ ahl al-madīna al-fāḍila (Die Prinzipien der Ansichten der Bewohner der vortrefflichen Stadt) (Hansberger)
Al-Fārābīs Schrift Mabādiʾ ārāʾ ahl al-madīna al-fāḍila wird auszugsweise im arabischen Original gelesen. Die Übung ist nicht nur für Teilnehmer des Fortgeschrittenenseminars „Al-Fārābī, Die Prinzipien der Ansichten der Bewohner der vortrefflichen Stadt“ gedacht, sondern steht allen Interessenten offen, die sich im Lesen arabischer philosophischer Texte üben wollen.

Summer Semester 2014 (April 7 - July 12)

Fortgeschrittenenseminar - Plotinus, Enneads 6.8 (Adamson)
One of the greatest treatises in Plotinus' Enneads is 6.8, "On Free Will and the Will of the One." Here Plotinus sets out to discover the sense in which the First Principle, or One, is "free" or "wills" the production of all other things. In the process of answering this question he gives a subtle account of the freedom possessed by lesser entities, including us. The seminar will mostly be taught in English but participants who would rather discuss and translate in German are also welcome. However participation requires some facility with Ancient Greek, as participants will take it in turns to present the text.

Fortgeschrittenenseminar und Übung - Aristotle: Physics III-IV (Anagnostopoulos, Castelli)
We will explore Aristotle's Physics III & IV, which investigate basic concepts of his natural philosophy, such as change, time, and place. Discussion and most readings will be in English. Participants are expected to undertake one presentation. We will regularly read secondary literature alongside the primary text. An optional 2-hour session in which we read the text in the original language will be held immediately after.

Fortgeschrittenenseminar - Al-Ghazālī, The Incoherence of the Philosophers (Tahāfut al-Falāsifa) (Di Giovanni)
This seminar features a classic of Arabic philosophy that will be read in the original language and commented upon both linguistically and philosophically. The work selected is the Tahāfut al-Falāsifa (The Incoherence of the Philosophers) by the greatest theologian of Islam: Abū Ḥāmid Muḥammad al-Ghazālī (d. 1111). In this refutation of various philosophical claims and attendant excommunication (takfīr) of philosophers al-Ghazālī appropriates notions and argumentative patterns used by his opponents, and his critique turns out to be so elaborate as to compete with the level of sophistication demonstrated by professional falāsifa. At the same time the Tahāfut al-Falāsifa lies at the crossroads of philosophy and theology (kalām) insofar as it provides a philosophical description of Ghazālian standards for ‘orthodoxy’ and, conversely, apostasy from Islam. Concurrent with doctrinal analysis, the text of al-Ghazālī will be subjected to linguistic and grammatical examination. Participants must read Classical Arabic, appreciate its fundamental phonological, morphological and syntactical principles, as well as recognize the formal structures which underlie the Arabic language. Knowledge of Classical Arabic at an intermediate level or higher is a prerequisite for the class along with active participation in analysis and translation. The course may ideally - but need not - be taken as a complement to the Essaykurs "Metaphysics in Islam". Knowledge of English and Classical Arabic (intermediate) required.

Fortgeschrittenenseminar – Eleatismus (Rapp)
Als "Eleatismus" bezeichnet man eine Strömung innerhalb der frühgriechischen Philosophie, die ausgehend von dem süditalienischen Ort "Elea" vor allem durch den Philosophen Parmenides maßgeblich geprägt wurde. Der Eleatismus ist eine der erstaunlichsten Bewegungen der Philosophiegeschichte. Er behauptet, dass das Seiende - das, was ist - nur eines ist, unentstanden ist und auf unbewegliche und unveränderliche Weise existiert. Damit leugnet der Eleatismus de facto so wichtige Phänomene wie Bewegung, Entstehen/Vergehen und Vielheit. Das widerspricht klarerweise dem gesunden Menschenverstand - und doch beeinflusste der Eleatismus die Philosophiegeschichte in wichtigen Hinsichten: Platon z.B. verteidigt in Anlehnung an den Eleatismus die Auffassung, dass das wahrhaft Seiende - für Platon die Ideen - ewig und unveränderlich sein muss. Auch der philosophische Atomismus übernimmt von den Eleaten die Auffassung, dass das letztlich Seiende, nämlich die Atome, unentstanden und unveränderlich ist. Das Seminar befasst sich mit der bis heute äußerst kontroversen Deutung der Eleaten und wirft einen Blick auf die Rezeption eleatischen Denkens in der antiken Philosophie.

Oberseminar - Aristotle's Physics, Book I (Adamson, Primavesi, Rapp)
We will read and discuss the first book of Aristotle's Physics. This book includes a famous discussion of the number and kind of principles that the philosopher of nature must grasp. It also provides in-depth discussions of the accounts of presocratic philosophers. The seminar will be held in English; knowledge of Ancient Greek is required

Oberseminar - Alexander of Aphrodisas, On Providence (Adamson)
In this work, lost in Greek but preserved in two Arabic translations, the great ancient commentator Alexander of Aphrodisias sets out a theory according to which the heavens are the instruments of divine providence. He also seeks to absolve them of blame for evils that occur in the earthly realm. We will translate and discuss the Arabic text. The seminar will mostly be taught in English but participants who would rather discuss and translate in German are also welcome. However participation requires some facility with Arabic, as participants will take it in turns to present the text.

Oberseminar - Averroes' Commentary on Metaphysics Book Lambda (Adamson)
The so-called "Long Commentary" of the great Muslim commentator Averroes (d.1198) is a major text in the history of philosophy, for several reasons. Most obviously, it contains brilliant and incisive discussion of the meaning of Aristotle's text. Also it preserves further commentary from earlier thinkers, particularly otherwise lost material from the greatest ancient commentator on Aristotle, Alexander of Aphrodisias. Finally, the Arabic text can be used as a witness for the textual tradition of the Metaphysics itself. In this seminar we will discuss all three of these aspects, as we examine the Long Commentary on Book Lambda, in which Aristotle presents his philosophical treatment of immaterial substances, including God.

Kolloquium - Kolloquium für Habilitanden, Doktoranden, Magistranden, Masterstudenten (Rapp)

 

Wintersemester 2013-14 (14.10.2013-8.2.2014)

Oberseminar - The Book "Alpha elatton" in Aristotle's Metaphysics (Adamson, Primavesi, Rapp)
We will read and discuss the text of book Alpha elatton in Aristotle’s Metaphysics. In addition, we will deal with the tradition of ancient and medieval commentaries on this particular book. The seminar will be held in English; knowledge of Ancient Greek is required

Oberseminar - Late Antique Philosophy: Alexander of Aphrodisias On Fate (Adamson)
In this seminar we will read, in ancient Greek, the treatise On Fate by the 2nd c. AD commentator Alexander of Aphrodisias. In this treatise Alexander uses materials from a range of Aristotle's works to attack Stoic determinism, which according to Alexander prevents anything from being "up to us." Alexander also sets forth a novel, though supposedly Aristotelian, theory according to which fate is equivalent to nature.

Fortgeschrittenenseminar - Antike Moralpsychologie (Brüllmann)
Untersuchungen im Bereich der Ethik führen zwangsläufig auf Fragen der Moralpsychologie. Und dies aus durchaus unterschiedlichen Gründen. So sollte zum Beispiel (1) sichergestellt sein, dass die Moral keine Forderungen an uns stellt, die wir psychologisch gesehen gar nicht erfüllen können. Unsere moralische Urteilspraxis ist zudem (2) oft mit impliziten psychologischen Annahmen verbunden (etwa zur Freiwilligkeit und Zurechenbarkeit von Handlungen), die explizit zu machen sind. Außerdem wird (3) die Frage, was moralisch richtig ist, nicht selten mit Hilfe psychologischer Begriffe beantwortet (etwa wenn behauptet wird, dass eine moralisch richtige Handlung aus einer bestimmten Motivation heraus erfolgen muss). Psychologische Fragen sind nicht zuletzt relevant (4) für den Bereich der Moralerziehung (wo es zum Beispiel um den Erwerb von Tugenden geht). Und insgesamt sollte (5) unsere ethische Theorie in eine angemessene psychologische Theorie eingebettet sein; schließlich sind auch moralische Handlungen Handlungen und auch Tugenden sind Charaktereigenschaften.Themen wie diese beschäftigen auch die antike Ethik seit ihren Anfängen bei Sokrates. In unserem Seminar werden wir versuchen, uns einen Überblick über die wichtigsten Fragen, Positionen und Argumente der antiken Moralpsychologie zu verschaffen. Dabei werden uns unter anderem begegnen: Sokrates‘ Thesen, dass Tugend Wissen ist und niemand freiwillig das Schlechte tut; Platons Lehre von den Seelenteilen und seine Konzeption einer Idee des Guten; Aristoteles‘ Zweiteilung der Tugenden, seine Theorie der phronêsis und seine Bemerkungen zur Freiwilligkeit und Zurechenbarkeit; sowie die Stoische Auffassung des richtigen Handelns in einer universell determinierten Welt.

Fortgeschrittenenseminar und Übung - Aristoteles Metaphysik: Die Substanzbücher (Christof Rapp, Christian Pfeiffer)
Kommentar: In den Büchern VII und VIII der Metaphysik wendet sich Aristoteles der Frage nach der Substanz (ousia) zu, d.h. der Frage, was die ontologisch grundlegenden Dinge sind. In diesem Seminar werden wir versuchen, Aristoteles' Argumentation und Antwort auf die Frage nach der Substanz im Detail zu verstehen. Das Seminar ist vierstündig und besteht aus einem zweistündigen Seminar, in dem zentrale interpretatorische Fragen der einzelnen Kapitel diskutiert werden, sowie einer zweistündigen Übung, in der der Text im Griechischen Original gelesen wird. Dies ist die Fortsetzung des im Sommersemester begonnen Hauptseminars. Eine Teilnahme im letzten Semester ist aber keine Voraussetzung für die Teilnahme an dem Seminar. Es ist möglich, neu zu diesem Kurs hinzuzukommen.

Fortgeschrittenenseminar - Freiheit und Notwendigkeit. Gotteslehre bei Avicenna, Thomas von Aquin und Johannes Duns Scotus (Adamson zus. mit. Prof. Dr. Isabella Mandrella)
Der im Mittelalter stattfindende Einfluss der arabischen Philosophie auf das Denken des lateinischen Westens rückt zunehmend in das heutige philosophische Forschungsinteresse und wird mittlerweile als gleichbedeutend mit der Wirkung betrachtet, die die griechische Philosophie hinterließ. Dieser Einfluss soll im Seminar anhand ausgewählter Texte des Avicenna, des Thomas von Aquin und des Johannes Duns Scotus am Beispiel des Gottesbildes aufgezeigt werden, das sowohl im christlichen als auch im arabischen Kontext im Spannungsfeld von Notwendigkeit und Freiheit kontrovers diskutiert wurde: Wirkt Gott als reine Vernunft mit Notwendigkeit oder hat er aufgrund seines Willens die Freiheit, kontingent wirksam zu sein? Diese Diskussion bietet gleichzeitig Gelegenheit zu einer Einführung in das Verhältnis von christlicher und arabischer Philosophie im Mittelalter.

Fortgeschrittenenseminar - Philosophy of Mind at the Crossroads of Ancient Greece and Italien Renaissance: Averroes's Theory of the Intellect (Di Giovanni)
The Arabic philosopher Ibn Rushd (Averroes), a pre-eminent commentator of Aristotle, is at the origin of one dramatic crisis in the Western culture at its encounter with Islam. His philosophy of mind was highly acclaimed by philosophers from the Middle Ages until Italian Renaissance, but it upset the social and religious conservatives preoccupied with its unorthodox, subversive implications. This soon became a burning issue. The seminar presents this long-lived interpretation of Aristotle's noetics in a detailed, comprehensive, and progressive manner. It starts from the Aristotelian background, the philosophical antecedents of Averroes, and the evolution of the theory throughout the subsequent stages of Averroes's reflection. It brings out its philosophical contours and merits. Finally, it connects it with another concomitant doctrine: the view of beatitude as pure state of the mind and the product of philosophical exercise. Readings are taken from Aristotle’s treatise On the Soul, Averroes’s commentaries on this treatise (especially his Long Commentary on Book 3), as well as selected passages in Averroes’s essays dealing with the question of ‘conjunction’ between man and the supernal, as obtained through philosophy and realizing man’s felicity. Primary readings are complemented by selected pieces of secondary literature which cast light on especially difficult or controversial issues.

Kolloquium - Musaph Workshop (Rapp)
This course is intended for doctoral students in the Munich School of Ancient Philosophy. We will discuss original texts and recent secondary literature with an eye towards improving research methods and writing. In addition, doctoral students will present their work. Topics will vary in accordance with the research interests of doctoral students.

Vorlesung - Aristoteles' Ethik Heute: Aristotelismus in der praktischen Philosophie der Gegenwart (Rapp)
Kommentar: In der praktischen Philosophie der Gegenwart haben einige Thesen aus Aristoteles’ ethischen Schriften (der Nikomachischen Ethik, der Eudemischen Ethik, der Politik) eine überraschende Renaissance erlebt. Verschiedene Positionen der neueren Ethik, z.B. die Tugendethik, der neo-aristotelische Naturalismus, der Kommutarismus, knüpfen explizit an Aristoteles an. Autoren wie Elizabeth Anscombe, Alasdair MacIntyre, Martha Nussbaum, John McDowell, Michael Thompson und andere haben zu dieser Strömung beigetragen. Die Vorlesung stellt nach einem eingehenden Resümee der Aristotelischen Ethik einige dieser Positionen vor und diskutiert Bedeutung für die Ethik der Gegenwart.

Philosophisches Arabisch: al-Kindī, Fī ’l-Falsafa al-ūlā (ergänzende Übung zum BA-Seminar al-Kindi, Die Erste Philosophie) (Hansberger)
Al-Kindīs Werk „Fī ’l-Falsafa al-ūlā“ wird im arabischen Original gelesen. Die Übung steht nicht nur Teilnehmern des LK/BA-Sem. „Al-Kindī, Die Erste Philosophie“ offen, sondern allen Interessenten, die sich im Lesen arabischer philosophischer Texte üben wollen. Die Ausdrucksweise al-Kindīs, der am Anfang der philosophischen Tradition im Arabischen steht und sich seine Terminologie erst erarbeiten mußte, ist in ihren Eigenarten von besonderem Interesse. Textgrundlage: al-Kindī, Kitāb ilā l-Mu‘taṣim bi-llāh fī ’l-Falsafa al-ūlā. Ediert in: Roshdi Rashed & Jean Jolivet (Hrsg.), Oeuvres philosophiques et scientifiques d’al-Kindī: Vol. 2: Métaphysique et cosmologie, Leiden 1998, S. 9-99; alternativ in M. ‘Abd al-Hādī Abū Rīda (Hrsg.), Rasā’il al-Kindī al-falsafīya, Kairo 1950, S. 97-162. Der Text ist auch enthalten in Al-Kindī, Die Erste Philosophie (arabisch-deutsch). Übersetzt und eingeleitet von Anna Akasoy, Freiburg 2011.

 

Summer Semester 2013 (April 15 - July 20)

Oberseminar: Aristoteles' Metaphysik B und die späteren Bücher der Metaphysik (Peter Adamson, Christof Rapp, Oliver Primavesi).
This seminar will draw on discussions of book B in the previous semester and extend to the treatment of the puzzles raised in B in the subsequent books of the Metaphysics.

Oberseminar: Plotinus' Enneads (Peter Adamson)
A weekly 2-hour group devoted to the Enneads of Plotinus, the founding text of Neoplatonism. The text will be read in ancient Greek, usually one chapter per week; members of the seminar take it in turns to translate into English and lead discussion of that week’s text. In SoSe 2013 the text to be read will be Ennead VI.4, which considers the question of how immaterial being can be omnipresent without losing its unity.

Fortgeschrittenenseminar: Aristoteles' Metaphysik. Die Substanzbücher (Christof Rapp, Christian Pfeiffer)
In den Büchern VII und VIII der Metaphysik wendet sich Aristoteles der Frage nach der Substanz (ousia) zu, d.h. der Frage, was die ontologisch grundlegenden Dinge sind. In diesem Seminar werden wir versuchen, Aristoteles' Argumentation und Antwort auf die Frage nach der Substanz im Detail zu verstehen. Das Seminar ist vierstündig und besteht aus einem zweistündigen Seminar, in dem zentrale interpretatorische Fragen der einzelnen Kapitel diskutiert werden, sowie einer zweistündigen Übung, in der der Text im griechischen Original gelesen wird. Es ist überdies geplant, das Seminar im WS 2013/14 fortzusetzen. Griechischkenntnisse sind erwünscht. Kenntnis der Metaphysik von Aristoteles sowie aktive Teilnahme (Referat, Protokoll) und Bereitschaft, Sekundärliteratur auf Englisch zu lesen sind erwartet.

Fortgeschrittenenseminar: Aristotle’s Doctrine of Substance and the Commentators (Gabriele Galluzzo)
One of the most difficult problems for both ancient and contemporary interpreters of Aristotle is to reconcile the two different accounts of substance that he presents in the Categories and in the central books of the Metaphysics. The main difficulty consists in making the Categories ontology of particular objects consistent with the matter-form analysis (hylomorphism) which Aristotle develops in the Metaphysics. For the analysis of particular objects in terms of matter and form seems to call into question the primacy that Aristotle assigns to them in the Categories. The class aims at exploring the way in which late ancient and medieval commentators have attempted a general reconstruction of Aristotle’s doctrine of substance. Particular attention will be devoted to Alexander of Aphrodisias, Averroes, Albert the Great, Thomas Aquinas, Duns Scotus and John Buridan as representatives of different lines of interpretation of Aristotle’s text. The analysis of ancient and medieval texts will be conducted against the background of the contemporary debate over the significance of Aristotle’s doctrine of substance.

Fortgeschrittenenseminar und Essaykurs: Mind (Nous) in Ancient Philosophy (Andreas Anagnostopoulos and Chris Noble)
In this seminar, held in English, we will discuss theories of nous (mind, reason) in Aristotle, Alexander, and Plotinus (and perhaps others). Central issues include the ontological status of nous, the relation between nous and its objects, the distinction between nous and other forms of cognition and the relation of nous to potentiality and actuality. Discussion will be structured around recent secondary literature. Participants are expected to undertake one presentation. Connected to the seminar, we will offer an optional session in which we will read the central primary texts in the original language (Tues. 18-20).
Tuesdays Tuesdays 16:00-18:00 Ludwigstr. 25 4b and 18:00-20:00 Geschw.-Scholl-Pl. 1 - B 015

Fortgeschrittenenseminar und Essaykurs: Philosophie in der islamischen Welt (Peter Adamson)
Zu der philosophischen Tradition in der islamischen Welt gehören solche bedeutende Denker wie al-Kindi, al-Farabi, Avicenna, al-Ghazali, Averroes, und Maimonides. In diesem Seminar werden Werke u. a. dieser Philosophen gelesen, mit Blick auf den Hintergrund der Debatten in der islamischen Theologie (kalam) und der Überlieferung der altgriechischen Philosophie in der arabischen Sprache. Kenntnis der arabischen Sprache ist für das Seminar nicht erforderlich; Primärliteratur wird auf Deutsch und Englisch gelesen. Philosophische Themen, die besonders im Mittelpunkt stehen: Freiheit, Ewigkeit des Universums, Intellektstheorie, göttliche Attribute.

MUSAΦ Workshop (Christof Rapp, Andreas Anagnostopoulos).
This course is intended for doctoral students in the Munich School of Ancient Philosophy. We will discuss original texts and recent secondary literature with an eye towards improving research methods and writing. In addition, doctoral students will present their work. Topics will vary in accordance with the research interests of doctoral students.

Winter Semester 2012-13 (October 15 - Feb. 9)

Oberseminar - Aristotle’s Metaphysics Beta (Peter Adamson, Oliver Primavesi, Christof Rapp).
This seminar will be devoted to a close reading of the third book of Aristotle's Metaphysics, book Beta. This is a book in which Aristotle sets out the problems to be dealt with in "first philosophy," that is, the science of metaphysics. Major themes include the nature and unity of a philosophical science, the subject-matter of first philosophy, the status of first principles, and the status of mathematical objects, as well as the question of whether we should accept the existence of Platonic Forms.
Tuesdays 12-14, Leopoldstr. 11 B - 433

Fortgeschrittenenseminar - Epistemology from Plato to Hellenistic Philosophy (Peter Adamson).
This course will examine theory of knowledge in ancient philosophy, beginning with key dialogues of Plato including the Meno and Theaetetus. It will then proceed to discuss Aristotle and compare his views to those of Plato; here the focus will be on Aristotle's Posterior Analytics. Across these texts we will see that both Plato and Aristotle operate with a very demanding conception of knowledge, something that continues in the Hellenistic period. The course will look at the "Nachleben" of these ideas in Hellenistic schools, the Epicureans, Stoics and Skeptics. A further course by the same instructor will be offered in the following semester; this will pick up the story with the Neoplatonists and ask how knowledge and belief were understood in late ancient and medieval philosophy.

Fortgeschrittenenseminar - Aristotle, Posterior Analytics (Andreas Anagnostopoulos and Christian Pfeiffer)
In this seminar (held in English), we will read and discuss the whole of Aristotle's Posterior Analytics, which provides an account of the structure of science and scientific knowledge. Our discussion will be guided by recent secondary literature -- roughly one article per week. Those participating should have some background in Aristotle and be willing to undertake a presentation of one piece of secondary literature. Credit is earned through a term paper. In addition, this seminar should ideally be taken alongside a reading course, in which we will work through the Greek text. The reading course will take place immediately afterwards.

Fortgeschrittenenseminar The Reception of Aristotle’s Metaphysics (Gabriele Galluzzo).
The course will focus on the Arabic and Latin reception of Aristotle’s Metaphysics, with particular reference to the theory of substance outlined by Aristotle in the so-called ‘central books’ (VII-VIII-IX) of the Metaphysics. Ideally, the course will fall into two parts. The first will be devoted to introducing the key concepts of Aristotle’s mature ontology, including substance and accident, essence and definition, universals and particulars, and matter and form. In the second part, attention will be paid to the medieval interpretations of Aristotle’s theory of substance. In this context, particular emphasis will be put on Averroes’s and Aquinas’s commentaries on the Metaphysics, which present two influential and incompatible readings of Aristotle’s metaphysical thought. The course as a whole will have a theoretical orientation and aims to investigate the philosophical consequences of Aristotle’s views and of those of his interpreters. Moreover, classes will be introductory in character and presuppose no previous acquaintance with Aristotle’s Metaphysics.

Fortgeschrittenenseminar Late Medieval Philosophy (Gabriele Galluzzo).
The course will examine the XIII-century reception of Avicenna’s doctrine of essence and will focus in particular on the works of Albert the Great, Thomas Aquinas, and John Duns Scotus. Avicenna’s doctrine of essence sets the stage for the Latin medieval discussion of a host of philosophical issues, including the relationship between essence and existence, the problem of universals, and the status of fictional and purely mental entities in general. By examining the different ways in which XIII-century philosophers understood Avicenna’s teaching on essence, the course aims to offer an introduction to some of the crucial themes of late medieval philosophy and to reconstruct their complex interplay.  Particular attention will be paid to how the Avicennian model interacts and interferes with the Aristotelian paradigm in metaphysics, which becomes dominant in the Latin world at the beginning  of the XIII century and centres on a notion of essence significantly different from the one that we encounter in Avicenna’s writings. The course presupposes no knowledge of Latin or of medieval philosophy.

MUSAΦ Workshop (Andreas Anagnostopoulos).
This course is intended for doctoral students in the Munich School of Ancient Philosophy. We will discuss original texts and recent secondary literature with an eye towards improving research methods and writing. In addition, doctoral students will present their work. Topics will vary in accordance with the research interests of doctoral students.

Summer Semester 2012 (April 16-July 21)

Oberseminar - Aristotle's De Motu Animalium 2.0 (Oliver Primavesi, Christof Rapp).
This seminar builds upon the results of the seminar held in the Wintersemester 2010-11 and in addition is especially devoted to discussion of the proceedings of the Symposium Aristotelicum held at LMU in April 2011.

MUSAΦ Workshop (Andreas Anagnostopoulos).
This course is intended for doctoral students in the Munich School of Ancient Philosophy. We will discuss original texts and recent secondary literature with an eye towards improving research methods and writing. In addition, doctoral students will present their work. Topics will vary in accordance with the research interests of doctoral students.

Hauptseminar - Platons Timaios (George Karamanolis).
Platons Dialog Timaios ist ein Meisterwerk und hat die Philosophie bis zur Zeit der Renaissance stark beeinflusst. Der Dialog befasst sich mit der Entstehung der Welt durch Chaos. Die Hauptfigur des Dialogs erzählt einen Schöpfungsmythos. Nach diesem Mythos ist Gott, ein Intellekt, der Schöpfer der Welt. Gott ahmt die ewigen Modelle der Ideen in der Schöpfung der Welt nach. Das Produkt der Schöpfung ist die Welt, die von Rationalität und Intelligibilität gekennzeichnet ist. Ein Teil der Schöpfung der ganzen Welt ist auch die Schöpfung der Seele und des Körpers des Menschen, und es wird erklärt, wie die menschlichen Organe funktionieren. Wir werden den Timaios lesen und ihn mit Hilfe der Sekundärliteratur und der antiken Interpreter analysieren.

Hauptseminar - Aristotle's Metaphysics Θ (Andreas Anagnostopoulos).
This course will be taught in English. In this course we will read book Theta of Aristotle's Metaphysics as well as recent secondary literature. The topic of this book is the study of one of the four aspects of being which Aristotle considers for separate study, namely, actual and potential being. The other three are being as substance, treated in books Zeta and Eta, which has received the majority of attention, being as truth, which is confined to one chapter, and accidental being, which does not merit separate study. Some of the main questions addressed are the nature of capacities for change, the relation between having a capacity and being something potentially, whether there exist unexercised capacities, and the priority of actuality over potentiality.